Can the police tell me i can't fly my drone in a park

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I was recently photographing a bridge in a park and the police stopped me and told me that drones were not allowed in the park. Do the police have the authority to tell me that I cannot fly my drone since they do not control the airspace. If I'm flying with a legal license and authorization from the FAA control facility can I continue to operate my drone? The unmanned aircraft Pilot's Handbook says I am not required to present my license or certifications to just any official Authority only an FAA authorized inspector

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City park ..city police? maybe there is a local ordinance? Did they say anything other that you werent allowed to fly?
 
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N017RW

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You always follow police instructions.
Go home do your research, visit station and ask supervisors.
 
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Certainly in the U.K. There are certain areas and parks, etc. that come under localised regulations and the owners can impose whatever rules they want, I assume it is the same? As an example, in London there are numerous Royal and Borough parks and they all ban drones unless specific exemption is applied for.


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Yes they can, in certain circumstances. They can also direct you to land the AC. While they don't, as you have said "control the airspace" they could sight plenty of other acts they have authority to administer including those relating to Public Order, Protection from Harassment, Sexual Offences, Terrorism, breach of the peace, public nuisance etc. You are best to explain your intent to land (probably, as I chose to do, explain you will be walking away from them to bring the AC in at a safe distance) and that you will then have a conversation with them. In my case it was not police (council ranger) and to cut a long story short the outcome was that in his view I probably wasn't allowed to fly where I was however he accepted he couldn't explain why or sight a particular offence. He suggested I enquire with council as to the regulations. Which I didn't and haven't had an issue since. I was over water, did not fly over people or within 30m of any buildings, cars etc and was within VLOS (sort of). Didn't matter who was wrong it wasn't, in my view, worth the hassle of an argument.
 
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If the city has an ordinance that you cannot operate RC vehicles (cars, trucks, airplanes—which would include quadcopters) in city parks, then you cannot launch and land in said park.

However, you can launch from outside of the park (assuming all other laws/regulations are being followed) and then fly over the park—again, following all regulations such as not flying over unprotected people, etc, etc.

You are correct in that the city can control the ground, but not the air above.
 
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Check the rules of the ground location you are at (Park Rules).

If they don't allow aerial vehicles, then yes, you can be asked to leave.

Now that said, if there is another undeveloped area near the bridge you can launch from, then launch from there. But you are playing in a gray area IMO.

Whether or not Reg 107 requires you to show your licence or not, you are opening yourself to a bad time of things if you want to play the "You cant tell me that I can't ..."
 
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Mark The Droner

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I...The unmanned aircraft Pilot's Handbook says I am not required to present my license or certifications to just any official Authority only an FAA authorized inspector
The police are an FAA authorized inspector since the FAA has specifically asked the police to help enforce FAA rules.
 
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Yes they can, in certain circumstances. They can also direct you to land the AC. While they don't, as you have said "control the airspace" they could sight plenty of other acts they have authority to administer including those relating to Public Order, Protection from Harassment, Sexual Offences, Terrorism, breach of the peace, public nuisance etc. You are best to explain your intent to land (probably, as I chose to do, explain you will be walking away from them to bring the AC in at a safe distance) and that you will then have a conversation with them. In my case it was not police (council ranger) and to cut a long story short the outcome was that in his view I probably wasn't allowed to fly where I was however he accepted he couldn't explain why or sight a particular offence. He suggested I enquire with council as to the regulations. Which I didn't and haven't had an issue since. I was over water, did not fly over people or within 30m of any buildings, cars etc and was within VLOS (sort of). Didn't matter who was wrong it wasn't, in my view, worth the hassle of an argument.
Yep I couldn't agree more. Having many friends that are both city, county, and state police, the best thing to do is land and talk to them. Let them know you are just getting some amazing photos of the bridge and then ask them if they know of any really nice spots. I've gotten more amazing spots this way than you can imagine. But always be polite and be willing to teach them a little about your drone and can and won't do.

coming from mars
 
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I think you would have to talk to the local police/city office to find out. Some cities have ordinances against certain things (aka uav flying) in public parks.
 
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Certainly. I have a number of documents. Here's one attached. I can post more if you like...
I like this paragraph in the FAA-LEA document. It doesn't say we can't fly and video a cool looking dam, right? ...
FDC 4/0811 SPECIAL NOTICE. THIS IS A RESTATEMENT OF A PREVIOUSLY ISSUED ADVISORY NOTICE. IN THE INTEREST OF NATIONAL SECURITY AND TO THE EXTENT PRACTICABLE, PILOTS ARE STRONGLY ADVISED TO AVOID THE AIRSPACE ABOVE, OR IN PROXIMITY TO SUCH SITES AS POWER PLANTS (NUCLEAR, HYDRO-ELECTRIC, OR COAL), DAMS, REFINERIES, INDUSTRIAL COMPLEXES, MILITARY FACILITIES AND OTHER SIMILAR FACILITIES. PILOTS SHOULD NOT CIRCLE AS TO LOITER IN THE VICINITY OVER THESE TYPES OF FACILITIES.
 
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The police are an FAA authorized inspector since the FAA has specifically asked the police to help enforce FAA rules.
The reason I think this is not correct is because on the UAS exam one of the questions was who are you required to present your license to, and the options were

1-FAA authorized inspector
2-any person of authority
3-local law enforcement

And the correct answer was 1.


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Mark The Droner

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How would you define faa authorized inspector?

Seems to me choice 1 does not exclude choice 3
 
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The reason I think this is not correct is because on the UAS exam one of the questions was who are you required to present your license to, and the options were

1-FAA authorized inspector
2-any person of authority
3-local law enforcement

And the correct answer was 1.


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You are entitled to form the view it is not correct but perhaps for reasons other than, or at least in addition to, those you have stated. In the document posted above by @Mark The Droner it is clearly stated that the laws administered by the FAA are enforced by them and prescribed alleged offences investigated by FAA officers. It does not say police have the authority to investigate alleged FAA offences. It says that frequently where UAV are operated in a manner that would contravene FAA guidelines it is often the case that other offences, including some that fall within the purview if laws and regulations administered and within the authority or local law enforcement that actions by police within their authority will contribute to an outcome of maintaining and increasing safety.
 
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How would you define faa authorized inspector?

Seems to me choice 1 does not exclude choice 3
Unfortunately Mark it seems from the doc you posted 3 is specifically excluded. It is clear that local law enforcement do not have the authority to investigate alleged breaches of the FAA regulations. They may collect vital evidence and lawfully provide it to the FAA to support a later investigation/prosecution however.
 
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They may collect vital evidence...
Wouldn't your certification card be considered evidence? As is any video captured? In other words, they can take your card and your aircraft, controller, tablet/smartphone, carrying case, etc.
 

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