Part 107? Here's how to file for Airspace Authorizations

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It is illegal to fly as a Part 107 operator in controlled airspace without FAA approval.

Here's how to request an Airspace Authorization.

Go to Request to Operate in Controlled Airspace

Select Airspace Authorization: short term (less than 6 months)
Most of the form you can fill out with your information and needs. Below is the information you will need to gain access to controlled airspace.

Where it asks for Radius enter 1 NM.

Proposed area of operations (enter what is between quotes below):
“Request to operate UAS within the confines of the FAA issued UAS facility map. Request to operate at 400 feet but will except the maximum allowed safe altitudes within the facility map to receive the authorization. Excluding the appropriate NO FLY ZONE in the immediate vicinity of the airport. “

Proposed maximum flight altitude: 400’
These are for airports in the Phoenix metro area, but you should get the idea from these for how to file where you need.

You will have to make a separate request for each airport. Use these lat/longs
Class B | KPHX 33 ° 28’ 00” N | 112 ° 6’ 00” W
Class D | KDVT 33° 44’ 00” N | 112° 7’ 00” W
Class D | KSDL 33° 40’ 00” N | 111° 56’ 00” W
Class D | KFFZ 33° 30’ 00” N | 111° 45’ 00” W
Class D | KIWA 33° 22’ 00” N | 111 ° 38’ 00” W
Class D | KCHD 33° 13 ’ 00” N | 111° 47’ 00” W
Class D | KGEU 33° 30’ 00” N | 112° 16’ 00” W
Class D | KGYR 33° 24’ 00” N | 112° 21’ 00” W

Description of proposed operation:
Before each mission, the Part 107 Pilot in Command (PIC) will perform normal pre-flight checks to include the following:

1. Selection of a safe take-off off location in a well-lit area that is free of obstacles. This space will be clear of persons and or physical structures that may interfere with the safe operation of the sUAS.

2. Inspect the sUAS to make sure the aircraft is airworthy and meet both Part 107 and FAA requirements.

3. When the aircraft is determined to be airworthy, it will commence airborne operations to a preset FAA authorized altitude. The sUAS will, at varying times, hover in place and take videos, photos and/or mapping data.

4. PIC and any crew present will maintain VLOS for the duration of the flight while monitoring for other flight traffic in and around affected airspace. The PIC will adhere to all rules and regulations under Part 107.
 
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There is a difference between Airspace Authorization and Airspace Waiver and they handled be two different depts within the FAA. Airspace Waivers require more justification. See this link - Waiver Safety Explanation Guidelines for Part 107 Waiver Applications

Airspace Authorizations require less justification and are usually approved quicker, but are only good for 6 months. Go to my original post above for how to get an Authorization...NOT a Waiver.

Once the new LAANC system becomes active the current process for obtaining authorizations and waivers should become obsolete. Next couple of years, fingers crossed within the next year.
Coming This Fall: Automated Airspace Authorization at U.S. Airports - AirMap
 
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Same question as Yogi, how many authorizations have you been granted using this template? Mine were approved with considerably less detail.
 
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I have about 15 using this information. The FAA uses a number of different contractors (processors) that review and approve/deny the information provided through the online FAA form.

When this all first started there was some different interpretations among the processors that led to the exact same Airspace Authorization request being approved by one processor and denied by another. There was a learning curve because this was all so new and evolving, but they have gotten things pretty much ironed out now.

Also, the actual online form has changed from what it was initially. It's not a great form now, but it's way better than before. Hopefully LAANC will be in place soon and you won't have to worry about filing this way to fly in controlled airspace.
 
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Were you able to get a waiver based on that template?
Just to be clear, this is for an Airspace Authorization, NOT an Airspace Waiver. Authorizations and Waivers are handled by different depts within the FAA. A Waiver requires much more information but lasts up to two years. Authorizations are good up to 6 months but are easier to get and don't take as long.
 
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Nice.

So you have 15 blanket authorizations that go up to 400ft agl?

I personally own about 10 at the moment, but only up to 200ft agl for the most part. Mine were granted before the LAANC grids were released. But I am interested to see how this next batch of 20 more does where I asked for 400ft blankets.
 
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Also I wanted to note I find it funny how the FAA makes the distinction between waivers and authorizations and the time frame for both. And then they go ahead and grant authorizations that are good until June 30th 2018. Well past 6 months.
 
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So you have 15 blanket authorizations that go up to 400ft agl?
The altitudes only go up to the altitude assigned within the UAS Facility Map (grid map). So in some areas 400' (further from airport) in other areas down to 100' (closer to airport). It all depends upon where I am operating.
grid.jpg
 
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Also folks be aware a lot of Class D Airspace is not FULL TIME!!! A lot of smaller airfields only operate Monday to Friday Dawn to Dusk, or they post operational hours on FAA websites. In addition many smaller Military Airfields are closed on weekends. A simple rule is Whenever the tower is closed, there is no Class D Airspace. You must CALL the airfield EVERYTIME to determine if Airspace is active or not, simply ask their hours of operation and if they will be active on the weekend support guard or reserve unit exercises ...a simple phone call...when it’s closed, as long as you aren’t flying over military property you are good to go.

A su
 
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We have a military airfield identical to what you are suggesting. It is M-F 8 AM to 6 PM where it is Class D airspace, then it is Class G airspace outside of those hours. It's operational at other times by NOTAM at least 24 hours in advance. But don't assume that the airspace turns into Class G automatically when the tower is closed. It could turn into Class E to the surface with radar service provided by ATC. This information is available in the Airport Facility Directory, by reading any VFR sectional, and NOTAMs on the FAA website. Unless operating under Part 101, not sure it is necessary to call them each and every time. Towers will stick to their schedule religiously and will certainly issue a NOTAM if that is changed for any reason. Don't rely on a phone call to get all your answers. The information is out there and available without any calls.
 
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We have a military airfield identical to what you are suggesting. It is M-F 8 AM to 6 PM where it is Class D airspace, then it is Class G airspace outside of those hours. It's operational at other times by NOTAM at least 24 hours in advance. But don't assume that the airspace turns into Class G automatically when the tower is closed. It could turn into Class E to the surface with radar service provided by ATC. This information is available in the Airport Facility Directory, by reading any VFR sectional, and NOTAMs on the FAA website. Unless operating under Part 101, not sure it is necessary to call them each and every time. Towers will stick to their schedule religiously and will certainly issue a NOTAM if that is changed for any reason. Don't rely on a phone call to get all your answers. The information is out there and available without any calls.
True that, but as a pilot, the info is geared to pilots
We have a military airfield identical to what you are suggesting. It is M-F 8 AM to 6 PM where it is Class D airspace, then it is Class G airspace outside of those hours. It's operational at other times by NOTAM at least 24 hours in advance. But don't assume that the airspace turns into Class G automatically when the tower is closed. It could turn into Class E to the surface with radar service provided by ATC. This information is available in the Airport Facility Directory, by reading any VFR sectional, and NOTAMs on the FAA website. Unless operating under Part 101, not sure it is necessary to call them each and every time. Towers will stick to their schedule religiously and will certainly issue a NOTAM if that is changed for any reason. Don't rely on a phone call to get all your answers. The information is out there and available without any calls.
True that, but most drone operators are not certified pilots like you or myself, because as you know, before we take off, we do route planning, and contact tower of any airfield with controlled airspace prior to take off. Now typically we do that by tower frequency if it’s a Class D and that info is on the sectional...a little inside info here...the phone number you call is usually the tower operators phone number! If there is not Tower operator, there is no ATC Services.... Now there are some smaller Class Ds that are ajoined by a Class C (larger airfield), in that case, because it’s typically also military, you call RAPCON (Radar Approach Control) Officer on duty of the Class C to double check the status...reason is, in these cases when the Class D remains active it is under the Class C control towers ATC Services. If you don’t have a servicing ATC in the absence of the Class D airspace airfield tower...then by default the Class D is inactive, as there must be active ATC services provided for the controlled airspace to be active. This is very detailed info, most won’t care to know, but it is how it works. And as pilot and drone operator, it tells me very quickly if I can launch from my yard or not...which is off post, but under Class D.
 
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True that, but as a pilot, the info is geared to pilots

True that, but most drone operators are not certified pilots like you or myself, because as you know, before we take off, we do route planning, and contact tower of any airfield with controlled airspace prior to take off. Now typically we do that by tower frequency if it’s a Class D and that info is on the sectional...a little inside info here...the phone number you call is usually the tower operators phone number! If there is not Tower operator, there is no ATC Services.... Now there are some smaller Class Ds that are ajoined by a Class C (larger airfield), in that case, because it’s typically also military, you call RAPCON (Radar Approach Control) Officer on duty of the Class C to double check the status...reason is, in these cases when the Class D remains active it is under the Class C control towers ATC Services. If you don’t have a servicing ATC in the absence of the Class D airspace airfield tower...then by default the Class D is inactive, as there must be active ATC services provided for the controlled airspace to be active. This is very detailed info, most won’t care to know, but it is how it works. And as pilot and drone operator, it tells me very quickly if I can launch from my yard or not...which is off post, but under Class D.


Not certified pilots? I believe any Part 107 pilot is very much certified. It is a REAL license issued by the FAA with REAL consequences and fines for not following the rules. Just as any pilot who holds a certificate under Part 61. I'm not buying the fact control towers need to spoon feed UAV pilots with information that is freely available. The fact is UAVs are here to stay....the FAA has integrated them into the NAS, and those who hold a Part 107 license need to man up and learn what they need to do to fly safely. This includes finding information on their own just as any Part 61 pilot is expected to do. There are no participation trophies awarded here. Personally, I don't think the Part 107 test is tough enough. I'm hoping they add to the requirements as time goes on, but we'll see whether people are learning what they need to fly safely or not. The information sources I mentioned in my post are available for ANYONE needing to fly an aircraft (manned or UAV) in the national airspace system. PERIOD! There are no, "I'm a pilot, but they aren't" in the eyes of the FAA. You may not like that because they didn't go thru the long hours and classroom time you and I may have done, but it is what it is.

Just because no one answers the phone when you call ATC DOES NOT mean the tower is closed, nor does it mean the airspace is inactive. The ONLY thing it means is someone was too busy handling traffic to answer a petty call about whether they are open or not. This isn't a shopping mall. Please do not spread false information by implying that if someone calls a tower number and receives no answer that they can safely assume the airspace is inactive. That's just plain irresponsible!

If you are a Part 107 pilot, learn where to get the right information, don't repeatedly call a poor, busy, tower controller to send you a text message every time they open the tower. You are expected by the FAA to learn this information. Tower operators are not there to be your flight instructor....they are WAY too busy for that nonsense.
 

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