How to store my LiPo's for the next 4 months

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I will probably not be using my LiPo's for the next 4 months, and was wondering how I should store them? Batteries are stored inside in my home. Temperature inside where they are now, is proximately a stable 20 degrees Celsius. Do I need some special attention? Your advise is welcome!
 
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Charge them to where the third light just starts to flash then check them monthly to make sure they haven’t self discharged significantly- put them back in the charger when the second light is flashing.
 
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A LiPo may loose 20% capacity per year when stored at 100% charge, but only loose 5% capacity when stored at 50% charge. Aging can also be slowed down by storing at a lower temperature. At 0ºc a fully charged cell only looses about 6% capacity per year.

For longest life, store your batteries with 50% charge or less, and keep them cool.
 
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A LiPo may loose 20% capacity per year when stored at 100% charge, but only loose 5% capacity when stored at 50% charge. Aging can also be slowed down by storing at a lower temperature. At 0ºc a fully charged cell only looses about 6% capacity per year.

For longest life, store your batteries with 50% charge or less, and keep them cool.
This is of little relavence to the OP’s question, principally because the auto discharge will take the battery down to around 65% if left at rest anove that for the preset days to discharge.

As to best storage level the consensus is that 40% SOCis ideal for LiION chemistry. 65% should not be if any great detriment as a starting point and provides a good safety margin if the packs are left for extended periods.

The figures your quoting are for usable capacity loss. This is different from self discharge rate which may be as little as 5% for good quality packs (subject to SOC and other factors).
 

msinger

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I am Canadian and it just gets too cold for my fingers so I also store my batteries for long term and this is what I did last year. Bring my batteries to storage levels like the other post said, I have the DJI hub so it makes it easy, I place my 4 batteries in a ammo box (good seals) with a silica gel pack and put them in the fridge (not freezer). Then the flying bug will gets to me and cold or not I just have to fly because flying my Syma indoors does not cut it anymore. I take the ammo box out of the fridge the day before (do not open) and let it get to room temperature, the outside of the case will condensate for a few hours but the sealed case with silica packs keep your batteries dry. On fly day charge to 100% and go have fun, after the second battery flying at -20c you remember why you stored them in the first place. Here is another thing I do, when coming in with your craft from the cold, turn the bird off and leave the battery in, place the bird in a plastic bag and tie it up outside, when you will hit the humid air inside your house the outside of the bag will condensate a lot and not your craft (very very little), after about a hour I take it out of the bag remove the battery and let it air out and make sure it is warm and dry before placing in it's case with silica gel packs. Same goes for swapping batteries in the cold, keep your fresh batteries close to your body for heat and do it outside, do not go inside the house from the cold to swap your battery as your craft will condensate. The P4 can fly better than the pilot at -20c. If you do take it out in the cold don't just sit there and hover, take off a start moving, when I cruise at 30mph (50kph) as this is my usual speed my batteries run around 44c and I get the same flight times. Flick6211, don't put them too far away because on a beautiful days I bet you will sense the need to go for a run or two or three even more. My batteries have around 85 cycles each in the last 18 months and all 4 lights are on for battery life and I still get about 20 minutes flight cruising around 30mph and going over 40,000 feet total distance and land at 20%+-. It pays to take care of your batteries and craft.
 
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Thank you all for your detailed explanation. It is clear for me.

I still have a supplementary question. Should I also protect the connectors on the battery against corrosion (for example, add a small amount of contact spray)?
 

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I still have a supplementary question. Should I also protect the connectors on the battery against corrosion (for example, add a small amount of contact spray)?
It probably wouldn't hurt them assuming whatever you use is safe for plastic. I've never heard of Phantom batteries corroding, so it's probably not going to be beneficial.
 
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The connection between your battery and your drone is something like the human artery. You may use some electrical grease if you want. But it is not necessary.
 

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Do as you wish.
It’s not required.
They’re gold plated.
It will likely just retain dust/dirt.
 
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