Exposure question

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#1
I was doing a panorama shoot for a company (not going to mention name). Their criteria includes no filters and you cannot use auto exposure. It was very bright and sunny. I had my ISO on 100 and to even see a view I had to set my SP to 1/'120. Here is a sample photo. They rejected my shoot for overexposed pictures. Any advice on how I can get a lower exposure. I was using D-Log also.

Any help is appreciated as I have to go re-shoot and will not be making any money but hopefully will get more jobs.

Thank you.

Droner66
 

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#3
It is a P3 Pro. I just got it on Friday and it is my first real UAV so I am in a bit of a learning curve. I will look in the manual unless you know.

Thank you.
 
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#4
It has a fixed aperture so that won't work but it does have exposure compensation. It can be adjusted using the wheel on the right side of the controller. Are you using post processing software like Lightroom or Photoshop? They can fix a lot of in camera issues.
 

Meta4

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#5
Any advice on how I can get a lower exposure. I was using D-Log also.
The camera settings you used were wrong for that scene and lighting.
Getting proper exposure shouldn't be difficult.
The camera has built-in metering to do the job for you.
I'd ignore the suggestion to avoid auto-exposure because it sounds ridiculous.
(Did they really say that?)
A properly exposed image is a properly exposed image regardless of whether the photographer manually adjusted settings or the camera did it for him.

Can you upload the image to dropbox or similar and post a link so I can see what settings were used?
 

Meta4

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#7
Are you using post processing software like Lightroom or Photoshop? They can fix a lot of in camera issues.
About the best you could do with Photoshop etc is something like this:

But that degree of overexposure is one thing you can't fix.
There's nothing in the sky and it's 50% of the image.
 
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#15
It can be tough when the horizon is in the middle of the shot on a bright day. If you press the right wheel twice, you will see the exposure compensation setting light up red. You can then adjust the exposure plus or minus 3 stops by rotating the wheel. You will see the results immediately on your screen.

This might not be the best explanation, the best way to see how it works is to try it out.
 

Meta4

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#17
Your exposure details for that shot were:
1/250 sec; f/2.8; ISO 100 Manual; Centerweighted-Average metering
All of the shots in that sequence were over exposed so the settings were not correct to get a good exposure.
If the exposure settings you start with are going to overexpose, that's what happens.
you'll need to practise a bit more to work out how to get proper exposure (or use autoexposure0.
Try a bit of both and see how things work out.
 
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#19
They reason they do not want auto exposer is because the exposes will be different from image to image and when stitched in the pano, you can see it. If you use a polarizing filter you will see the different grades of polarization in the images, again noticeable in the pano. Neutral density filters do not have the same affect.
 
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