Where can I fly?

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I just passed my Part 107 test and now I am even more confused than ever. I thought as long as you stay out of restricted areas and 5 miles away from airports than you can fly legally (I use this http://knowbeforeyoufly.org/air-space-map/ and then call ATC if I am close to a small airport).

But, flying commercially the FAA makes it seem as though you need a waiver to fly in B, C, D, and E airspace (which is almost everywhere SkyVector: Flight Planning / Aeronautical Charts).

What am I supposed to follow?
 
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Just passed my exam as well - congrats!

It really comes down to exactly where you are going to fly. You technically could be within a given "shelf" within Class B airspace and still fly for example, but it depends on where exactly.

Lets say I want to shoot a wedding, golf course (for profit), etc. that is within a Class B airspace but where I am going to be shooting the airspace starts at 6000 ft. and goes to 10000 ft. Remember those "improper fractions" that are on charts (e.g. 100/60)? If this is where you are going to be shooting, no need for a waiver since you would be under the shelf, meaning the Class B airspace in this area does not start until 6000 ft. As long as there is no other airspace around, you would be flying in Class G airspace.

If you are in an area where the chart shows something like 40/SFC (from the surface to 4000 ft.), well, you technically then would need a waiver since your drone would start from the surface and go up to a max of 400 ft. You are going to be right next to the airport in this case.

Hope this helps.
 
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Your first paragraph pretty much sums up a few Hobby / Recreation rules, which of course are different than 107 rules.

flying commercially the FAA makes it seem as though you need a waiver to fly in B, C, D, and E
True.

...and E airspace ...
Class E normally starts at 1200' AGL unless it shows as a fading magenta line / circle / etc, then inside the fade it's 700'. So unless otherwise, Class G is where you fly without needing anything, which is from the ground to the next layer up. Since you are restricted (without an authorization) to 400' AGL, you will not run into Class E.

Where is Class G? Anywhere there isn't any other Class.

You may also be thinking of Surface Class E, which is shown as a dashed magenta area. The Logic Behind Class E Airspace You cannot fly there.


What am I supposed to follow?
Either. Depends if you are flying hobby / rec. or Part 107.


You technically could be within a given "shelf" within Class B airspace and still fly for example, but it depends on where exactly.
Technically ;-) , then you are not within a Class B area, but rather underlying a shelf of it. Which might be G or E or D or C or ... The sectional maps will show you.
 
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Get the app: AirMap. Turn on all the layers for commercial flight.
(I usually leave heliport unchecked as they show up after you press next, with their phone numbers and the layer makes it hard to see the map in L.A.)

This app is the best way to tell where you can fly and who to notify.
 
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Just passed my exam as well - congrats!

It really comes down to exactly where you are going to fly. You technically could be within a given "shelf" within Class B airspace and still fly for example, but it depends on where exactly.

Lets say I want to shoot a wedding, golf course (for profit), etc. that is within a Class B airspace but where I am going to be shooting the airspace starts at 6000 ft. and goes to 10000 ft. Remember those "improper fractions" that are on charts (e.g. 100/60)? If this is where you are going to be shooting, no need for a waiver since you would be under the shelf, meaning the Class B airspace in this area does not start until 6000 ft. As long as there is no other airspace around, you would be flying in Class G airspace.

If you are in an area where the chart shows something like 40/SFC (from the surface to 4000 ft.), well, you technically then would need a waiver since your drone would start from the surface and go up to a max of 400 ft. You are going to be right next to the airport in this case.

Hope this helps.
Thanks for the feedback!
 
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Your first paragraph pretty much sums up a few Hobby / Recreation rules, which of course are different than 107 rules.



True.



Class E normally starts at 1200' AGL unless it shows as a fading magenta line / circle / etc, then inside the fade it's 700'. So unless otherwise, Class G is where you fly without needing anything, which is from the ground to the next layer up. Since you are restricted (without an authorization) to 400' AGL, you will not run into Class E.

Where is Class G? Anywhere there isn't any other Class.

You may also be thinking of Surface Class E, which is shown as a dashed magenta area. The Logic Behind Class E Airspace You cannot fly there.



Either. Depends if you are flying hobby / rec. or Part 107.




Technically ;-) , then you are not within a Class B area, but rather underlying a shelf of it. Which might be G or E or D or C or ... The sectional maps will show you.
Thanks! I think that sky vector is just confusing me. So I would be able to fly in the New York area to the right in the outer Class B portion since the floor is 3,000 ft.
upload_2016-11-29_18-49-30.png



Another quick question, according to the FAA aerial map users guide, this blue circle is considered a NAVAID. Does this mean it is also classified as Class B Airspace? If so, I can't seem to find the ceiling/floor indicator.
upload_2016-11-29_18-46-38.png
 
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Get the app: AirMap. Turn on all the layers for commercial flight.
(I usually leave heliport unchecked as they show up after you press next, with their phone numbers and the layer makes it hard to see the map in L.A.)

This app is the best way to tell where you can fly and who to notify.
I will check it out thanks
 
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I'm a private instrument-rated pilot, also hold a Part 107 license. The blue circle is just the compass circle for the VOR beacon 'Sparta' at the center of the circle. It has no airspace significance. Fly on.
 
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So I would be able to fly in the New York area to the right in the outer Class B portion since the floor is 3,000 ft.
I'm looking at the map you posted and don't see a floor indicator of 30[00] to the right of "New York" so if you could put a big arrow on where you are wanting to fly, or Lat. / Lon. co-ordinates, that would help.
 
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The inner circle around New York is 70/Sfc so no flying anywhere in or around NYC without authorization.
 
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I'm a private instrument-rated pilot, also hold a Part 107 license. The blue circle is just the compass circle for the VOR beacon 'Sparta' at the center of the circle. It has no airspace significance. Fly on.
U da man
 
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I'm looking at the map you posted and don't see a floor indicator of 30[00] to the right of "New York" so if you could put a big arrow on where you are wanting to fly, or Lat. / Lon. co-ordinates, that would help.
My bad the way I wrote that comment was deceiving. I am saying that I would be able to fly in this circle for example since the floor is 3000 ft.

upload_2016-12-1_19-32-26.png
 
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My bad the way I wrote that comment was deceiving. I am saying that I would be able to fly in this circle for example since the floor is 3000 ft.

View attachment 69816
Hmmm, I don't see why not in THAT spot. Yes, the floor is 3000 MSL and a nearby obstruction (the inverted V right above "Park Ridge") has a top at 513 MSL (312 AGL) meaning the local elevation is 201 MSL so adding 400' gives 601 MSL, well below the 3000'MSL ring bottom. But beware that in many areas inside the 70/30 "ring" are other airports of Class D & surface Class E areas

I'm sure if I'm mistaken someone will chime in, but from a pure FAA 107, Class G perspective, yeah.
 
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The red circled area is definitely Class G, good to fly under either set of rules. Just don't forget to check for any NFZ or TFR areas.
 
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The red circled area is definitely Class G, good to fly under either set of rules. Just don't forget to check for any NFZ or TFR areas.
Doesn't the app tell you if it is a NFZ as long as you use a cellular based device? I also use the knowbeforeyoufly airspace map before I fly
For TFRs I use the map on tfr.faa.gov
 

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