P4P Camera Style Settings that replicate D-Log

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I love using D-Log color, but I don't like the fact that it's locked at ISO 500. I want to do a workaround and use the "Normal" color at ISO 100 in combination with a CUSTOM STYLE that replicates the D-Log color setting.

What are the best settings (Sharpness, Contrast, and Saturation) to create a CUSTOM STYLE that most closely replicates "D-Log" color?? Do you just bring them all down to -3 across the board?? Any other recommended workarounds to replicate D-Log??

191014y1z4yr36m1yw4ar6.png
 
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I love using D-Log color, but I don't like the fact that it's locked at ISO 500. I want to do a workaround and use the "Normal" color at ISO 100 in combination with a CUSTOM STYLE that replicates the D-Log color setting.

What are the best settings (Sharpness, Contrast, and Saturation) to create a CUSTOM STYLE that most closely replicates "D-Log" color?? Do you just bring them all down to -3 across the board?? Any other recommended workarounds to replicate D-Log??

191014y1z4yr36m1yw4ar6.png

DLog increases reported iso due to heavy lifting of shadows as compared to none. DCinelike has a slight lifting of shadows without banding issues of highlights.

Reducing the contrast and saturation and exposing to the right should approach dlog "look", but I do not think you will get more range during postprocessing. For p4p, I always run with dcinelike / soft and leave the rest.
 
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Dlog is not a look intended for delivery/viewing, rather a capture curve/profile intended to better preserve shadows at the cost of highlights. Dlog will due to the 8 bit resolution of p4p files, result in banding of for instance a blue sky and is therefore not a ideal curve in most cases. (The iso reported is due to the heavy lifting of shadows as compared to none).

If you just want the look as such during editing (which I do not recommend), lifting the blacks/shadows and lowering the contrast and saturation should approach this.
It's my understanding that camera makers (in non-D-log modes like "Normal") put their own processing on images - what they think constitutes the ideal image. Examples: Nikon, Canon, and Sony. They put their own versions of color correction on an image before sending it on to the memory card. D-log lets you bypass that color correction and capture it before the camera applies its own color correction on the image. Some of the pro DSLRs even have an image space called "Flat" or "Flatt" for those that wish to have more control over images in post by starting at an unprocessed/uncorrected baseline, rather than starting with an image that's been subjected to the camera maker's built-in color correction. Make sense?
 
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It's my understanding that camera makers (in non-D-log modes like "Normal") put their own processing on images - what they think constitutes the ideal image. Examples: Nikon, Canon, and Sony. They put their own versions of color correction on an image before sending it on to the memory card. D-log lets you bypass that color correction and capture it before the camera applies its own color correction on the image. Some of the pro DSLRs even have an image space called "Flat" or "Flatt" for those that wish to have more control over images in post by starting at an unprocessed/uncorrected baseline, rather than starting with an image that's been subjected to the camera maker's built-in color correction. Make sense?
Dlog has a different utilization of the 8 bits available for recording (256 tones of each color) in short allocating more tones to shadows and less to highlights (a inverse gamma of regular profile)

This has the unfortunate side-effect of giving severe banding issues of for instance a clear sky or other low-detail areas which constitutes much of typical drone footage.

According to rumours, p5 will enable 10 bit recording (1024 levels) which should enable us to utilize dlog without this currently blocking limitation. The advantage of dlog vs none is much more freedom for tonal adjustments and styling during postprocessing, but it will need to be inversed during the postprocessing (normally a initial fixed color correction node) for a normal look/gamma.
 
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Dlog has a different utilization of the 8 bits available for recording (256 tones of each color) in short allocating more tones to shadows and less to highlights (a inverse gamma of regular profile)

This has the unfortunate side-effect of giving severe banding issues of for instance a clear sky or other low-detail areas which constitutes much of typical drone footage.

According to rumours, p5 will enable 10 bit recording (1024 levels) which should enable us to utilize dlog without this currently blocking limitation. The advantage of dlog vs none is much more freedom for tonal adjustments and styling during postprocessing, but it will need to be inversed during the postprocessing (normally a initial fixed color correction node) for a normal look/gamma.
I've had *severe* issues with D-Log with the roofs of houses (shingles next to each other with subtle shifts in grey) and thought that lowering the ISO (actuating more pixels) might help. Hard to describe but I'll call it "blocking" or extreme pixelation - a very distracting shimmer of sorts. To be honest, I've never used D-Cinelike but will try a run or two with it. I do like the idea of D-Log giving more leg room for tonal adjustments but would also like to avoid cutting off my nose in the process.
 
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