Can i use a Polarizer and ND at the same time?

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strictly it will act like another ND filter, if it is a circular polarizor, it will need to be turned to make the polarized effect work. A polarizor cuts light of a certain wavelength. An ND just block some light
 

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The polarising filter needs to be used carefully.
You need to rotate it to align with the position of the sun for the direction you will be filming from and then only film in that direction.
You can't fly here and there with it on and expect it to work properly.
It also has an ND filter built in and you probably shouldn't need to double up.

The polarising filter doesn't block certain wavelengths. It blocks scattered light and only passes light of a certain polarisation. This is why it is good for removing glare from water or shiny surfaces.

I'm surprised so many people are trying polarisers on their Phantoms and wonder how many are being used correctly.
They can be good in the right situation but are quite difficult to use properly in the air. You need to realign one of the elements every time you point the camera in a different direction.
They aren't a set and forget filter like most others.
 
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The polarising filter needs to be used carefully.
You need to rotate it to align with the position of the sun for the direction you will be filming from and then only film in that direction.
You can't fly here and there with it on and expect it to work properly.
It also has an ND filter built in and you probably shouldn't need to double up.

Depends how much light you want to let through, if you going to use a 2 stop filter then a polarisor adds a 3rd stop...

The polarising filter doesn't block certain wavelengths.

Correct and incorrect, In simple terms, a circular polarizing filter is rotated so certain wavelengths of light are blocked from entering the lens and hitting the sensor. This can be fine turned depending on the angle between your light source (the sun or light bulbs, typically) and the subject being photographed by spinning the filter until the desired effect is accomplished. It is not just scattered light...

I'm surprised so many people are trying polarisers on their Phantoms and wonder how many are being used correctly.
They can be good in the right situation but are quite difficult to use properly in the air. You need to realign one of the elements every time you point the camera in a different direction.
They aren't a set and forget filter like most others.

I shoot landscapes part time professionally and almost never take my polariser off. It makes everything vibrant and pop!!! What as Meta4 says use it with understanding of how it will effect the image.

*Edit*
Lee Filters website excerpt

Polarising filters are used to manage light at wavelength scale, and if magnified could be a likened to a series of microscopic slats.

In use, as the filter is rotated, it either transmits or blocks the waves of light that are vibrating in particular orientations. When light from the sun bounces off a flat non metallic surface, such as glass or water, it becomes polarised - i.e. all of the reflected light waves vibrate in the same plane. This reflected glare can be removed by the polarising filter.

Rotation of the filter will be needed to find the optimum position of the Polariser. In photographic terms this can render water or glass transparent, and gives the impression of saturating colours in a scene, because much of the reflected glare from the subject is removed by the Polariser.

On a clear sunny day, much of the light in the sky is also polarised, and the filter will give a very strong blue effect when used at 90 degrees from the sun - any white clouds will stand out impressively.
 
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Yes, first time I saw mentioned that a polarizer works best at a 90° angle to the sun.
 
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I agree with Meta4. Polarizing filters do not block different wavelengths of light. All objects reflect light in all directions. Think of the filter as window blinds set at an angle. Light from some planes will pass as others are blocked. It's all relative to light source.
 
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Hi, guys,

I have just bought this kit

http://phantomfilters.bigcartel.com...lters-for-dji-phantom-3-professional-advanced

Since they ar very thin, can i use the polarizer and the ND toguether? Does it have any advantage on te image?

Hi Miguel

Yes, you can use the POL-filter and an ND-filter at the same time. I personally do this all the time. During a sunny day up here in Denmark I'll usually use the POL-filter + ND8 filter - and the camera will be running at or very close to the optimum 60 shutter speed (ISO100, EV0) at 4K30 video.

If you have any other questions, I'll be happy to help.
 
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Yes, first time I saw mentioned that a polarizer works best at a 90° angle to the sun.

Yes, but that means that with the very wide angle of the lens not the whole scene is polarized.
In general you can say that polarizers and very wide angle lenses don't like each other.
 
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Yes, but that means that with the very wide angle of the lens not the whole scene is polarized.
In general you can say that polarizers and very wide angle lenses don't like each other.

That is not exactly my experience. I find that - at least the POL-filter I offer - works great with the relatively wide angle lens on the Phantom 3.

Check out this test-image I took with one of the POL-filters I sell, but where I have physically cut the POL-filter in half in order for the left part of the image to be where there is POL-filter in front of the lens and the right side of the lens is without any filter:

 
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That is not exactly my experience. I find that - at least the POL-filter I offer - works great with the relatively wide angle lens on the Phantom 3.

Check out this test-image I took with one of the POL-filters I sell, but where I have physically cut the POL-filter in half in order for the left part of the image to be where there is POL-filter in front of the lens and the right side of the lens is without any filter:

Your photo is not a good example. You should show the same photo twice so you use the total angle. One with and one without POL and also exposure corrected.

But from what I see in the recent foto; the pol-filter works only at the right side of the POL-part while the left part is unaffected. There is also a huge green/cyanshift in the polar part.
 

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