why am I getting Class E airspace warning

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@LUIS - thanks - my house is a lot closer to SFC territory than I realized, but not in it. 0.0038° in latitude and 0.0021° in longitude, or maybe about 1/3 mile to the north. Our flying park has much more freedom of movement ~ 1.5 miles. NW.
 
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The problem with airmap is they do not show the class e extensions. We are flying at Dorthea Dix park in Raleigh which is Under the 1700" class e BUT on the edge of the SE extension about where the inverted V 716 is. Where I live is due south of RDU above the word CARY. I have no problem there, but I haven't check recently.

I guess it is a good thing DJI is taking business away from Airmap, given their attitude and direction.
The 1700’ is the floor of class C airspace on the outer ring with class E right beneath it starting at 1699’. Kittyhawk ‎Kittyhawk: Drone Flight Ops also has sectional that show you where your at on the map.
 
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Been flying under part 61 as CFI LTA for twenty years I have always made it a practice required or not to build a relationship with the local ATC, They can be your best friend. They have a lot of great official and unofficial info available. Since I started flying my Part 107 drones it still works if your going to fly in their space a call is cheap and quite valuable to us as pilots.
 
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The Class E stuff looks like it confuses a lot of people, including me. But if you dig, it appears that only Class E airports (airports completely encircled by the dashed magenta) require authorization. From what I can find, for Part 107, Class E surface extensions of Class C or D do not require authorization, and this may be why the RDU Class E extension does not appear on Airmap. Reference this thread: Class E Surface area extensions ...
 
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They missed a very important metric in that study, which is only referenced if you read to the bottom of the article: "Researchers did not attempt to quantify how many, if any, of the detected flights were, in fact, authorized."
 
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Study finds drones flying into danger - AOPA

I have two issues with that piece.
"each marked with a maximum altitude (400 feet, 200 feet, or zero feet) below which a drone could be authorized to fly without creating unacceptable risk."
Wallace said. “At this point, we just don’t know.”

Is there a risk? YES! Well established.
Are you serious about mitigating it? NO!

Why publish something that has undetailed information. We find out that some of the drone sightings at Gatwick MAY have been their own surveillance drones. Really!

Putting regulations on fly areas that make no sense just encourages people to override them. Is 0 ft unacceptable? Only if it is flat ground with no access to humans, animals, fences, buildings, etc.

Can you fly IN your house in a NFZ? NO! Can you fly to 50Ft over your house? NO! What is the risk? That someone will override that? They will anyway if they are so disposed. Otherwise, it will just aggravate more people to ignore the restrictions and ruin the hobby.

I am 100% for bowtie zones. Makes all the sense in the world.
I am all for fly zones determined by a distance around and over the highest structure.
A runway should be 0 ft., but my house is not ON the runway so I should be able to fly 50' over my house to look at my roof, don't you think? If my house is located that close to a runway, I should move.

The NPS appears to be flat refusing to establish sensible regulations for a new use for the parks. After over 2 years, you would think that they would have come up with some ideas by now.

Numerous incidents of people and local police abuse always seems to be decided against the pilot. Do you think "always" is too strong a word?

It seems to me that the goal is to destroy the hobby, not to accommodate it. Let's scare the hell out of the public so we can pass the laws to eliminate hobby drones entirely.

Wallace said. “At this point, we just don’t know.”
 
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View attachment 107085 since hobbyists are not required to understand airspace, their only requirement to follow if they want to operate within 5 miles of airport is to notify ATC. In essence every pilot, whether sUAS or manned aircraft has to notify ATC in one way or another before entering class B, C, D, or E airspace.
In fact class B & C surface airspace generally extends beyond the 5 mile radius of which hobbyists by rule are allowed to fly in as long as they are outside the 5 mile radius, I don’t recommend doing so as you will get busted.
Its important to verify airspace accurately since the PIC is fully responsible for adherence to the FARs. The airport I flew out of as a commercial pilot was a class D part time towered airport but had the boundaries at 7 miles radius. I lived on a farm with a small airstrip but still had to call the tower just to take a simple pleasure flight in my experimental. The same level of rules apply to drones as we fly them. If you have ever had to tangle with FAA/NTSB it is quite intimidating and can be very expensive. Best practice is to call ATC and ask them specifically. Regarding position. Reference your Lat-Lon location and refer to it on an up to date sectional. We are not allowed to use out of date sectionals.
 
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Its important to verify airspace accurately since the PIC is fully responsible for adherence to the FARs. The airport I flew out of as a commercial pilot was a class D part time towered airport but had the boundaries at 7 miles radius. I lived on a farm with a small airstrip but still had to call the tower just to take a simple pleasure flight in my experimental. The same level of rules apply to drones as we fly them. If you have ever had to tangle with FAA/NTSB it is quite intimidating and can be very expensive. Best practice is to call ATC and ask them specifically. Regarding position. Reference your Lat-Lon location and refer to it on an up to date sectional. We are not allowed to use out of date sectionals.
By rule hobbyists are required to notify ATC ONLY when flying within 5 miles of an airport, while part 107 has to contact ATC when within the surface boundaries of class B,C,D, or E airspace. Before LAANC, part 107 only way to get authorization to fly in these Airspaces was to submit a waiver which took about 90 days. I would bet a good number of part 107 who had a job lined up that couldn’t wait the 90 days flew anyway under the hobbyists rule. I think we could agree that most class B,C, and D surface areas extend beyond the 5 mile (I would assume Statute mile instead of Nautical mile). So by rule hobbyists could legally fly in class B, C, and some D surface airspace that extends beyond the 5 miles without having to notify ATC. I would not tell anyone to do this but you have to wonder how many times a day does this happen in these Airspaces outside of the five mile radius by hobbyists and part 107 flying under the hobbyists blanket. I think every sUAS pilot whether hobbyists or part 107 should contact ATC when flying within class B,C, or Delta surface airspace regardless of distance from airport. I also agree that hobbyists or part 107 should contact a heliport if flying within 5 miles of heliport. This is good practice to follow whether the FAA puts it in writing or not. I’m sure any helicopter pilot would like to receive information on anything flying within his flight path. I use current sectionals on the fltplan go app, Kittyhawk app, and purchase paper ones on mypilotstore.com
 

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