Understanding AirMap & others

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Hey Everyone,

Ok, so I'm not new here and not new to flying, but I have recently acquired my Part 107 certification and will begin marketing aerial photography and videography through my creative design business, and I was wondering if you all have any advice regarding AirMaps and other online guides to where you can and can't fly. I'm a classic rule follower and not much of a risk taker, which usually results in me taking my P3P everywhere I go and then never flying it because I'm too timid.

Tomorrow I'll be in Atlanta and was hoping to get some sunset shots of the skyline, but I don't know where is the safest/smartest place to fly. Looking at AirMap, I see that much of the southeast section of the city is open from commercial airspace, however, there are plenty of recreational zones that have me nervous... Can I fly in these recreational airspace?

Interested to hear everyone's thought on this.
 

sar104

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Surely, if you just passed the Part 107 test, you are aware that where you can fly is entirely determined by airspace classification and, potentially, local ground rules on air operations. You referred to commercial and recreational airspace, but neither of those exists in the NAS.

If you actually are a certified remote pilot then you need to consult the VFR sectional for the Atlanta area for airspace classification and then check with flight services for TFRs and NOTAMs, possibly via one of the websites that provides all that information such as skyvector or vfrmap. Then you need to check that you are not operating from prohibited area on the ground, such as a park with posted restrictions.
 
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I fly regularly at Piedmont Park, but sunset shots will put you facing into the sun. Sunrise works better from there. Plenty of Class G airspace around Atlanta. Just be aware that there are several helipads in the area, with lots of low level helicopter traffic.

Check out www.skyvector.com and www.vfrmap.com for sectionals and TAC charts and you'll be good.

The hardest part will be to find an area to fly without a lot of people. Centennial Olympic Park may be crowded this weekend.

I'm working all weekend, or I'd offer to join you and show you around. Good luck. PM me if you need anything else.
 
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This is good information, and yes, it is rather ironic that I aced the Part 107 exam and have no idea what I'm doing. I'll acknowledge that.

Prior to this, I have literally ZERO aeronautical background. I studied hard to pass but I guess I probably did more memorizing than actual putting 2 and 2 together. The subject matter just seemed so bogged down with stuff that I don't consider super important to those of us operating drones that I probably didn't absorb some of the stuff I should have,

Thanks for the insight and the sass ;)
 
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sar104

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This is good information, and yes, it is rather ironic that I aced the Part 107 exam and have no idea what I'm doing. I'll acknowledge that.

Prior to this, I have literally ZERO aeronautical background. I studied hard to pass but I guess I probably did more memorizing than actual putting 2 and 2 together. The subject matter just seemed so bogged down with stuff that I don't consider super important to those of us operating drones that I probably didn't absorb some of the stuff I should have,

Thanks for the insight and the sass ;)

OK. Well then I would definitely check out the sectionals and practice until you understand what you are reading. If you have specific or general questions about sectionals then this site is very good at answering those questions, and questions on other Part 107 regulations in general. Plus you may get some real local knowledge as supplied by @Guzziknight above.
 
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OK. Well then I would definitely check out the sectionals and practice until you understand what you are reading. If you have specific or general questions about sectionals then this site is very good at answering those questions, and questions on other Part 107 regulations in general. Plus you may get some real local knowledge as supplied by @Guzziknight above.

I don't disagree, I need to learn it. I guess there is a fine line between learning it and applying it.
 
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I don't disagree, I need to learn it. I guess there is a fine line between learning it and applying it.
A hat tip for wanting to do it correctly. As sar104 stated, there is no such thing as recreational or commercial airspace. There is Class A,B,C,D,E, & G. Then there is Special Use Airspace; Prohibited, Restricted, MOA's, ADIZ, and a bit more.
I highly recommend vfrmap.com to research for intended flying areas. It will allow you to toggle between a Google Earth view, and the FAA Sectional map of the area. Click on an airport and it will bring up a data block with airport specific information.
Always check for TFR's before flight. They can & do pop up at a moments notice, and supersede requirements for any airspace designation they affect.
I have attached a link to the FAA Chart User's Guide. This will assist you in learning all of the charting symbology that you will need to understand. Feel free to ask any questions, here.
https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/fli...aero_guide/media/Chart_Users_Guide_12thEd.pdf
 
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A hat tip for wanting to do it correctly. As sar104 stated, there is no such thing as recreational or commercial airspace. There is Class A,B,C,D,E, & G. Then there is Special Use Airspace; Prohibited, Restricted, MOA's, ADIZ, and a bit more.
I highly recommend vfrmap.com to research for intended flying areas. It will allow you to toggle between a Google Earth view, and the FAA Sectional map of the area. Click on an airport and it will bring up a data block with airport specific information.
Always check for TFR's before flight. They can & do pop up at a moments notice, and supersede requirements for any airspace designation they affect.
I have attached a link to the FAA Chart User's Guide. This will assist you in learning all of the charting symbology that you will need to understand. Feel free to ask any questions, here.
https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/fli...aero_guide/media/Chart_Users_Guide_12thEd.pdf

Right, don't get the idea that I don't know what Class A,B,C, etc airspace is. I'm not that dumb. I was just referencing AirMap where it'll let you filter by commercial or recreational airspace. I guess that just threw me for a loop since I didn't think that was a thing..
 
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Right, don't get the idea that I don't know what Class A,B,C, etc airspace is. I'm not that dumb. I was just referencing AirMap where it'll let you filter by commercial or recreational airspace. I guess that just threw me for a loop since I didn't think that was a thing..
I never hinted you were dumb, sir. Anyone here will tell you I would not give a hill of beans for Airmap or any other 3rd party app for determining Airspace Regulations. They are not legal, they may not be maintained on a regular basis they all state that, if you look at the fine print in the app. Claiming you used one, as a defense to an FAA Certificate Action, will not hold water. A current FAA Sectional or TAC chart,(or their authorized, paid subscription, electronic counterparts), are the only legal method to perform this required part of flight planning.
Even vfrmap.com will tell you,
"Important: We do not guarantee the accuracy of data on this site. Always use official FAA sources for flight planning".
But, they are a good place to start. Current legal FAA Sectional's and TAC charts are available on the FAA website.
 
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Of course you didn't call me dumb. I'm joking around. I'm just new to this and trying to do it the right way. Ease up
You yourself stated that you have no idea what you are doing. Your posts confirm that. I offered help. Take it or leave it, I really don't care either way. I'm just trying to keep you off the six o'clock news. Drone on.
 
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You yourself stated that you have no idea what you are doing. Your posts confirm that. I offered help. Take it or leave it, I really don't care either way. I'm just trying to keep you off the six o'clock news. Drone on.
Well obviously I'm going to take it. I don't take any of this lightly. Just trying to figure out the best source for guidance. Duly noted, don't use AirMaps.
 

sar104

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Well obviously I'm going to take it. I don't take any of this lightly. Just trying to figure out the best source for guidance. Duly noted, don't use AirMaps.

Depending on your level of use and investment, you could also consider using the flight planning app ForeFlight. That makes everything really easy, but it does cost $100 per year.
 
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Well obviously I'm going to take it. I don't take any of this lightly. Just trying to figure out the best source for guidance. Duly noted, don't use AirMaps.
I & others are not comfortable with the new apps, because we have used FAA Sectionals for so long. Poke around and use what you are comfortable with, but don't disregard the legal implications.
 

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