This don’t sound good

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WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced the eight companies that will assist the Federal government in establishing requirements for future suppliers of Remote Identification (Remote ID). Remote ID will enable Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), commonly called drones, to provide identification and location information while operating in the nation’s airspace.

The FAA selected the following companies to develop technology requirements for future Remote ID UAS Service Suppliers (USS): Airbus, AirMap, Amazon, Intel, One Sky, Skyward, T-Mobile, and Wing. These companies were selected through a Request for Information process in December 2018.

“The FAA will be able to advance the safe integration of drones into our nation’s airspace from these technology companies’ knowledge and expertise on remote identification,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

This initial group will support the FAA in developing technology requirements for other companies to develop applications needed for Remote ID. The applications will provide drone identification and location information to safety and security authorities while in flight.

The technology is being developed simultaneously with the proposed Remote ID rule. Application requirements will be announced when the final rule is published. The FAA will then begin accepting applications for entities to become Remote ID suppliers. The FAA will provide updates when other entities can apply to become qualified Remote ID USS on FAA.gov.

Drones are a fast-growing segment of the transportation sector with nearly 1.5 million drones and 160,000 remote pilots now registered with the FAA. The agency’s ability to develop Remote ID technology simultaneously with the rule enables the FAA to continue to build on a UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system that has demonstrated global leadership through the small UAS rule and the implementation of the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC), which automates the application and approval process for most UAS operators to obtain airspace authorizations.
 
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a.gov

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced the eight companies that will assist the Federal government in establishing requirements for future suppliers of Remote Identification (Remote ID). Remote ID will enable Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), commonly called drones, to provide identification and location information while operating in the nation’s airspace.

The FAA selected the following companies to develop technology requirements for future Remote ID UAS Service Suppliers (USS): Airbus, AirMap, Amazon, Intel, One Sky, Skyward, T-Mobile, and Wing. These companies were selected through a Request for Information process in December 2018.

“The FAA will be able to advance the safe integration of drones into our nation’s airspace from these technology companies’ knowledge and expertise on remote identification,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

This initial group will support the FAA in developing technology requirements for other companies to develop applications needed for Remote ID. The applications will provide drone identification and location information to safety and security authorities while in flight.

The technology is being developed simultaneously with the proposed Remote ID rule. Application requirements will be announced when the final rule is published. The FAA will then begin accepting applications for entities to become Remote ID suppliers. The FAA will provide updates when other entities can apply to become qualified Remote ID USS on FAA.gov.

Drones are a fast-growing segment of the transportation sector with nearly 1.5 million drones and 160,000 remote pilots now registered with the FAA. The agency’s ability to develop Remote ID technology simultaneously with the rule enables the FAA to continue to build on a UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system that has demonstrated global leadership through the small UAS rule and the implementation of the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC), which automates the application and approval process for most UAS operators to obtain airspace authorizations.
Whew! Big Brother is alive and well. I was getting worried....

So these service suppliers are going to lay down the requirements for remote ID, huh? Couldn't come at a better time while DJI is apparently on life support and might not provide an update or solution for many many months, or years, if ever.

Anybody know the going salvage rate for plastic?
 
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Yep , they didn’t care about any letter they received about this . The fox is going to watch the hen house because big brother says so . (AMAZON) really
 
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a.gov

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced the eight companies that will assist the Federal government in establishing requirements for future suppliers of Remote Identification (Remote ID). Remote ID will enable Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), commonly called drones, to provide identification and location information while operating in the nation’s airspace.

The FAA selected the following companies to develop technology requirements for future Remote ID UAS Service Suppliers (USS): Airbus, AirMap, Amazon, Intel, One Sky, Skyward, T-Mobile, and Wing. These companies were selected through a Request for Information process in December 2018.

“The FAA will be able to advance the safe integration of drones into our nation’s airspace from these technology companies’ knowledge and expertise on remote identification,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

This initial group will support the FAA in developing technology requirements for other companies to develop applications needed for Remote ID. The applications will provide drone identification and location information to safety and security authorities while in flight.

The technology is being developed simultaneously with the proposed Remote ID rule. Application requirements will be announced when the final rule is published. The FAA will then begin accepting applications for entities to become Remote ID suppliers. The FAA will provide updates when other entities can apply to become qualified Remote ID USS on FAA.gov.

Drones are a fast-growing segment of the transportation sector with nearly 1.5 million drones and 160,000 remote pilots now registered with the FAA. The agency’s ability to develop Remote ID technology simultaneously with the rule enables the FAA to continue to build on a UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system that has demonstrated global leadership through the small UAS rule and the implementation of the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC), which automates the application and approval process for most UAS operators to obtain airspace authorizations.
Just stretches the life cycle of our current birds
 
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Capt KO

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That group is not going to look for an easy solution. They’re being paid to build a bureaucracy (USS). The simple system that DJI has already offered will not even be considered IMO. I feel a fight coming in the future when drone pilots revolt, if it gets expensive and intrusive. If we can’t retrofit our old drones, trouble ahead. Maybe I’ll remove all identification lol.

Big Brotha...........Make it simple, stupid
 
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That group is not going to look for an easy solution. They’re being paid to build a bureaucracy (USS). The simple system that DJI has already offered will not even be considered IMO. I feel a fight coming in the future when drone pilots revolt, if it gets expensive and intrusive. If we can’t retrofit our old drones, trouble ahead. Maybe I’ll remove all identification lol.

Big Brotha...........Make it simple, stupid
At some point, when laws get ridiculous enough, they just get ignored. Beyond that, imagine the cost of listening to every cubic meter of airspace in the country.
 
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At some point, when laws get ridiculous enough, they just get ignored.
I think over 50% of drone pilots fly beyond VLOS (~1500'), almost all the time. Am I wrong?

You've got to wonder why DJI thought it was a good idea for the M300 to have a 15km range, instead of sticking to 10km range (which seems incredible), like the MA2. I understand signal integrity is always better at 1500' (typical visual limit), if the drone can go farther with straight LOS connection, but was there really a demand for something better, 50% better, for VLOS usage? Maybe this helps mitigate disconnects when going behind a building, trees, or mountain. But then you've lost visual. Hmm.
 
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I’m not convinced they have the issue you described. Possibly they have other irons in the fire that may be more pressing than updates.
You may be right. I had heard DJI was laying people off by the boatload and offices going dark all over the place. I'm certainly no expert and I'm guessing you know better than I that story was a big fib.
 
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All these companies are big corporations, with deep connections to the current administration. Airmapp has the former head of the FCC on Their Board, and is funded by a major Hedge Fund. Airbus??? what do they have to do with Drones. When remote ID takes hold, your are going to have to have a "cell phone/internet connection" these connections won't be free, and who profits, the big telecoms... So this is NOT BIG BROTHER, as noted above, this is BIG CORRUPT BUSINESS. Which is how this administration runs now. The Drone Industry is made up of 1000's of independent pilots and small businesses, Amazon, wants to take that away, and T-Mobile want us to have to use their cell service. Note the FAA got 10000's of comments against remote ID and they are still going ahead with it. As for comments on DJI, they are fine. I know that personally, they are just hunkering down during the pandemic like everyone else.
 
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I don’t advocate ever breaking the LAW, however, I feel we all have at one time or another (whether intentionally or by accident). I think if they start over regulating, people will just operate their UAV’s the way they want. I remember the CB era, and how popular it became. So many people were operating their CB’s unlicensed the FCC finally had RETHINK their regs to accommodate so many rogue operators. A lot of the restrictions were relaxed or completely eliminated. I realize it’s different with airwave space vs air space, but if enough UAV pilots can ban together and make a nuisance of themselves it will all settle in a middle ground. Private planes aren’t supposed to be below 500’ UAVs are not to exceed 400’. I think we should be reasonably capable of staying out of each other’s airspace if a little common sense is observed.
 
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Yet ANOTHER reason to continue using legacy hardware, firmware and software. I look forward to the day when the FAA moves focus from the UAV to the pilot. The present 107 is a joke. Crappy pilots with zero experience are certified, and guys who have been flying UAVs before that was even a thing are not certified.

Dear FAA; Certify UAV pilots the way you certify full scale pilots. Create a common-sense written and practical test, and then enforce and punish infractions. Quit spending so much time and effort to get out of spending time and effort. Like full scale aviation, UAV aviation certification, monitoring and enforcement can't be automated.

Discuss.

D
 
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All these companies are big corporations, with deep connections to the current administration. Airmapp has the former head of the FCC on Their Board, and is funded by a major Hedge Fund. Airbus??? what do they have to do with Drones. When remote ID takes hold, your are going to have to have a "cell phone/internet connection" these connections won't be free, and who profits, the big telecoms... So this is NOT BIG BROTHER, as noted above, this is BIG CORRUPT BUSINESS. Which is how this administration runs now. The Drone Industry is made up of 1000's of independent pilots and small businesses, Amazon, wants to take that away, and T-Mobile want us to have to use their cell service. Note the FAA got 10000's of comments against remote ID and they are still going ahead with it. As for comments on DJI, they are fine. I know that personally, they are just hunkering down during the pandemic like everyone else.
I wish this Forum could remain non-political. The reference to "how this (Trump) administration runs...BIG CORRUPT BUSINESS" is just more of the tired old baseless attacks that have been going on for years. The FCC and the FAA don't take their marching orders from the White House. Yeah, I hate that drone pilots have to jump thru hoops while ultralight pilots can pretty much do whatever they want. But please keep the criticism the admin out of the discussion. Thanks
 
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I wish this Forum could remain non-political. The reference to "how this (Trump) administration runs...BIG CORRUPT BUSINESS" is just more of the tired old baseless attacks that have been going on for years. The FCC and the FAA don't take their marching orders from the White House. Yeah, I hate that drone pilots have to jump thru hoops while ultralight pilots can pretty much do whatever they want. But please keep the criticism the admin out of the discussion. Thanks

A-men.

D
 
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I don’t advocate ever breaking the LAW, however, I feel we all have at one time or another (whether intentionally or by accident). I think if they start over regulating, people will just operate their UAV’s the way they want. I remember the CB era, and how popular it became. So many people were operating their CB’s unlicensed the FCC finally had RETHINK their regs to accommodate so many rogue operators. A lot of the restrictions were relaxed or completely eliminated. I realize it’s different with airwave space vs air space, but if enough UAV pilots can ban together and make a nuisance of themselves it will all settle in a middle ground. Private planes aren’t supposed to be below 500’ UAVs are not to exceed 400’. I think we should be reasonably capable of staying out of each other’s airspace if a little common sense is observed.

I live in Jersey city where there is currently several helicopter tour must fly rover us to get to the Hudson River/New York harbor they routinely fly under 400’ feet around here I was nearly hit bu one once 200’ ft away from him,I was recording video that day too but never posted it here cause I didn’t feel like being attacked that day, they do doors off tours which I guess has a cooler affect flying closer to the ground
 
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Whew! Big Brother is alive and well. I was getting worried....

So these service suppliers are going to lay down the requirements for remote ID, huh?
All this conjecture misses the point that this project is for technology and standards development and implementation, not policy.
Most of the fearmongering and supposition in this thread is just wrong.

If you want more info, it's been discussed over on our sister forum here:
 
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I look forward to the day when the FAA moves focus from the UAV to the pilot. The present 107 is a joke. Crappy pilots with zero experience are certified, ...

Exactly, I talked to an FAA Rep about this very thing at the CES show this year... has was not very interested in my thoughts (what you said above)... he did indicted the 107 testing IS going to change - but would not elaborate.
 

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