OH NO!!!

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From my experience in travel, airlines don't examine your backpack, that's TSA's job. Discharge them to 50%, tape terminals for safety and have a good trip.


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From my experience in travel, airlines don't examine your backpack, that's TSA's job. Discharge them to 50%, tape terminals for safety and have a good trip.


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Thank you, you are correct. I shall do all that. I am booking trip right now. Aloha from San Jose, and aloha from Pahoa, Big Island of Hawaii Nov. 7. ps, anyone know any Phantom pilots on the Hilo side I can hook up with?
 
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All meaningless. The final ok is from the person behind the desk. That's all. That person at that time is the law. Doesn't matter what the real law, or policy, or regulations or rules are. It's all up to the guy behind the desk. It's like traveling to any foreign country. The law sits right behind the desk. He or she has the final say. At the TSA check they are god. What they say is final. Doesn't matter what the airlines say, or what FAA says. It is up to TSA that will allow or not. Nothing else matters. You can show links, letters, testimonials, and all is worth zero, nada, zilch. You can have terminals taped over, you can have discharged batteries, you can have the battery uninstalled, etc. What TSA decides at that time is all that counts. You can of course ask for a supervisor, but if the supervisor agrees with the search agent, that's it and it's final and it's tough shyte. All you can hope for is you get the right agent at the TSA search area when you're going through. (assuming you are following all the rules talked to about in this video)
 
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All meaningless. The final ok is from the person behind the desk. That's all. That person at that time is the law. Doesn't matter what the real law, or policy, or regulations or rules are. It's all up to the guy behind the desk. It's like traveling to any foreign country. The law sits right behind the desk. He or she has the final say. At the TSA check they are god. What they say is final. Doesn't matter what the airlines say, or what FAA says. It is up to TSA that will allow or not. Nothing else matters. You can show links, letters, testimonials, and all is worth zero, nada, zilch. You can have terminals taped over, you can have discharged batteries, you can have the battery uninstalled, etc. What TSA decides at that time is all that counts. You can of course ask for a supervisor, but if the supervisor agrees with the search agent, that's it and it's final and it's tough shyte. All you can hope for is you get the right agent at the TSA search area when you're going through. (assuming you are following all the rules talked to about in this video)
This is trending towards a harangue of no consequence now. You won't have an issue with your batteries at the border screening. Not unless you make a big song and dance about nothing on your way through and create unnecessary suspicion.

Enjoy your holiday!!
 
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Never! I am as quiet as a mouse. I never, ever, draw attention to myself. But I have also been to many foreign countries where the law sits behind the desk. I just hope that doesn't happen on the way there, or on the way back. Let me tell 'ya a little story. Because I am on a permanent feeding tube, I have to carry emergency liquid formula that comes in plastic containers (Iso-Source 1.5) Made by Nestle Corp. One time they rubbed the usual swab around the containers, and that one time it tested for EXPLOSIVES! lol, I have never been around explosives in my entire life. (Unless you count fireworks I used to confiscate as a cop many, many years ago.) Anyway, TSA went bananas! They immediately surrounded me and it took ONE HOUR to get through before they determined that it might have been a false positive. I almost missed my plane, the lolos. btw, it's not a holiday. We live half in Hawaii and half in California. But thank you anyway.
EL
ps, I never noticed you were from Oz. I love the people from there! They - and the Irish, my two favorites Anglos, lol.
 
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This is trending towards a harangue of no consequence now. You won't have an issue with your batteries at the border screening. Not unless you make a big song and dance about nothing on your way through and create unnecessary suspicion.

Enjoy your holiday!!

100% agree!
Flew to Maui on or about July 2nd, put my case on the belt, walked thru the metal detector and was met by my Phantom backpack on the other side. They asked no questions about anything.



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I know from expeirence its all about getting the wrong person when checking in. The security lady took one look at the Phantom batteries & I got a-NO way sir, you can give it to someone or leave it here. No amount of sharing battery info would sway her, thankfully her superior looked it over & gave them back to me saying - Maybe tape up the terminals next time. Luckily, for once in my life I was almost 2 hours early for the flight, cause this whole scene took over an hour to resolve!
 
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I know from expeirence its all about getting the wrong person when checking in. The security lady took one look at the Phantom batteries & I got a-NO way sir, you can give it to someone or leave it here. No amount of sharing battery info would sway her, thankfully her superior looked it over & gave them back to me saying - Maybe tape up the terminals next time. Luckily, for once in my life I was almost 2 hours early for the flight, cause this whole scene took over an hour to resolve!
Roy, and that is exactly my point. It all depends on who's behind the desk. Glad you're experience was finally resolved. I plan to follow all the suggestions, such as the terminal issue. I think I'll be fine. And btw, I'm always early. After flying a gazillion miles around the globe, I've learned that early is paramount.
 
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The link to the .pdf says a lot in that as far as the FAA and US DOT are concerned, the batteries can be brought aboard as carry-on, and checked in certain instances. However, if you read at the top, it says "Based on US DOT regulations (49 CFR, Sec. 175.10). TSA security, individual airline, and international rules may, at times, be more restrictive". So TSA, the airline, and international rules dictate what can be done, NOT the FAA. I would expect TSA interpretation to change depending on the terrorist level, and the other two opinions can change on a whim. In other words, we all roll the dice and take our chances. I would hope though that a copy of the .pdf guidance would be good ammunition in any discussion. I'm facing this same thing in November, so it is of great interest.
 
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I live in Quebec,Canada,and just planned a vacation at Cozumel,in mexique. Do you think i might have the same kind of problems,transporting my P4 and my 2 extra batteries???
 
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Eddie, have traveled to and from LAX to HNL many times with my gear. 4, Phantom batteries and drone in a carry on back pack, plus the controller. I usually fly on HA, UA and Virgin. No one has ever stopped me, from TSA to baggage to gate agent. No questions asked what so ever. As others have posted Alaska's baggage policy you should have no problems, especially if ~50% charged...

If you ask or act suspicious, you will likely raise concerns, or having to deal with uninformed representatives. If you are concerned, print out a copy of their policy and have it on hand. or also have Lipo battery bags on hand (something I've thought of, but never done). Good luck and don't worry. Aloha brah.
 
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I believe no matter who you fly with only two batteries per-person are allowed.
 
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I just talked on the phone to Alaska Customer Service Rep who verified with his supervisor that it is OK to take drone and battery as long as it is carry-on (of course carry-on, I don't trust those baggage handlers with my drone) *and* it is not attached to the drone. I explained it will be in a carrying case made specifically for the Phantom and the there is space for the battery. So looks like I can carry it on and the rep who replied to my email was WRONG! However, it is TSA who has the final say in all this. And if I encounter a TSA agent who is ignorant of this policy, then I will have to ask for a TSA supervisor and hope he/she is not as ignorant as the TSA behind the xray screen.
Thanks for all the input, I will be traveling in about 30 days. When I finally get to my destination I shall report back to this forum.
Thanks to all for your input
EL
I recently flew on Delta with my P 4. I carried on the ordinal case with the P 4 in it. However, I had the batteries in LIPO bags and took them out to declare them. I also had copies of FAA rules, Delta rules and a certificate of air worthiness from DJI, just in case. The TSA agent had never heard of Lithium batteries but let me through. Coming home, A TSA agent had to call her
supervisor because did not know about these batteries. The Supervisor approved and I went on my way.
I suggest you place all batteries in LIPO bags and declare them. Take copies of the rules in case you run into unknowing TSA agents.
 
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They seem to be afraid of something they don't understand. (Human nature at its finest). The issue is pressure. The reason that the batteries would be fine in the cabin of the aircraft with the bird is because of the equalized pressure in the cabin. It would be the same atmosphere as being in your home on the ground. Or very close to that anyway.

Good luck with this and I hpe you get them to understand that they are completely safe in that environment. Perhaps a letter from one of DJI techs/specialist on the flight batteries would be of some help to you and the airline.

Good luck.

Bud



Here is the reply to my question:
"October 2, 2016
Dear Eddie,
I appreciate that you took the time to contact Alaska with regard to your inquiry. The drone itself can be a carry on, however, the batteries are the issue. They cannot be checked or carried on.
As always, thank you for flying with us. We hope you'll give us the opportunity to exceed your expectations on another flight.
Sincerely,
Michelle Larson-Gridley
Customer Care Representative
Reference#: 2159621"

My question to Alaska was can I bring my Phantom 3 case on board as carry-on luggage and can I leave the battery attached to it or should I check it in with my other luggage?

Now I'm getting conflicting information on this forum. So maybe my next course of action is to call Alaska and ask for a supervisor. Maybe they can give the definitive answer to my original question.
Thank you all
EL
 
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They seem to be afraid of something they don't understand. (Human nature at its finest). The issue is pressure. The reason that the batteries would be fine in the cabin of the aircraft with the bird is because of the equalized pressure in the cabin. It would be the same atmosphere as being in your home on the ground. Or very close to that anyway.

Good luck with this and I hpe you get them to understand that they are completely safe in that environment. Perhaps a letter from one of DJI techs/specialist on the flight batteries would be of some help to you and the airline.

Good luck.

Bud
The entire tube of an airliner is pressurized and heated. How do you suppose they carry pets as cargo in the baggage compartment?
Also, at cruise altitude the cabin pressure is equal to about 7000-8000 feet above sea level
 
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The entire tube of an airliner is pressurized and heated. How do you suppose they carry pets as cargo in the baggage compartment?
Also, at cruise altitude the cabin pressure is equal to about 7000-8000 feet above sea level

As I understood it then entire cargo hold is not pressurized and heated. Pets go in the part that is. I have had some nasty explosions of toiletries in my checked bags.
 

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