Can a P4P ignite combustible gases?

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I guess the best example of where I'm headed with this is the age-old warning about cell phones and pumping gas at the gas pump.

In an environment where combustible gases are present, is it possible for the electrical components of a P4P (motors, controllers, batteries, etc) to ignite those gases and start a fire?

A prospective client who works in a safety-sensitive environment posed this question to me yesterday.

Thanks in advance.

KF
 

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I guess the best example of where I'm headed with this is the age-old warning about cell phones and pumping gas at the gas pump.
In an environment where combustible gases are present, is it possible for the electrical components of a P4P (motors, controllers, batteries, etc) to ignite those gases and start a fire?
A prospective client who works in a safety-sensitive environment posed this question to me yesterday.
You'd have to get the Mythbusters back to investigate.
How close to any possible sources of combustible gasses do you think you would be flying?
Is it easy to say your Phantom would be well away from such hazards?
 
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I guess the best example of where I'm headed with this is the age-old warning about cell phones and pumping gas at the gas pump.

In an environment where combustible gases are present, is it possible for the electrical components of a P4P (motors, controllers, batteries, etc) to ignite those gases and start a fire?

A prospective client who works in a safety-sensitive environment posed this question to me yesterday.

Thanks in advance.

KF
Kristina,

What is required in these type of environment is equipment that is intrinsically safe. The DJI P4P would not meet that need. There are manufactures thst specifically make things such intrinsically safe items, such as cell phones, for hazardous environments.

Normal practice in industries that have a potential exposure to hazardous enviroments is to perform site gas testing with special equipment. After that testing and monitoring, safe work can be performed using standard tools. Most sites will have specific standards and procedures to ensure work is performed in a safe manner.

David
 
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Well in the UK would need to be intrinsically safe, and comply with ATEX, a Phantom has no chance of getting anywhere near satisfying the requirements.
We used to buy a £30,000 fork truck and then spend as much again to make it comply with the Hazardous area regs.
 
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Your p4p is electic. In order for your props to turn there has to be an electromagnectic field produced. They may well be brushless motors but are not sealed, it would only take a a small amount of debre to enter one of the motors and friction could cause a small spark.
Thats just one part of the electrcal system. My advice would be to steer well clear of any areas that would risk an explosion.
I would think you would need a work permit along with a method statment and a risk assessment.
 
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Agree with Darren.

I work for a fire department, and am in charge of its UAS Program. Also I have been a Hazmat Technician for 10 years. Our proposed rules for our UAS for Hazmat Incidents is to ID product only from at least 100' away.

We had a SNG (lighter than air) leak nearby few months ago. Above us at the scene was what looked like a P3 Pro hovering 30' above. State Laws here aren't clear yet as to the distance of the FAA's 107 rule 'flying near' a Responder incident. This donkey was right over the leak. Could've been a potentially bad fire if it ignited. HM Captain said it was probably ok due to dispersal and the drones height. But if that thing sparked just at the right mixture of SNG and air...

Vendors have told me that because the motors are brushless, there is no spark. Electric, man. I'm not entirely convinced theres any UAS available that is intrinsically safe. I do want to see if I can test this at work somehow. Will report back.

IMO, I don't think UAV's should be near any hazmat other than to ID a product for now.
 
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I have not looked at the pcb of a P4, but given the efficiency, would probably be safe in assuming that there are no relays. Then the next question would be for switches. Currently there is only one on the AC, and it is probably not sealed to the level required for explosive enviroments. Thus, you would not want to be actuating it in the environment. The last thing has to do with the heat generated by the components and the heat of ignition. These are unknown for the AC, and may be unknown for the gas/vapor involved. Thus it is not a good idea to do in this type of situation.
 
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All functioning well there are no obvious ignition sources- there is likely an unacceptable risk if you were to crash however. A properly functioning mobile phone won’t present an issue where fuel is being dispensed but drop it and have the battery dislodge and you potentially have a monumental problem.
 
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That's the reason for risk assessments, to asses " what if the worst was to happen". The risk side of things would un my opinion be too great.
 
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If the air you would be flying in can be ignited by a spark your client has major process and environmental issues.
 
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I guess the best example of where I'm headed with this is the age-old warning about cell phones and pumping gas at the gas pump.

In an environment where combustible gases are present, is it possible for the electrical components of a P4P (motors, controllers, batteries, etc) to ignite those gases and start a fire?

A prospective client who works in a safety-sensitive environment posed this question to me yesterday.

Thanks in advance.

KF
Yes it’s possible. Your aircraft can certainly catch fire. Can you expect it to. Nope. When they drive out to the same location with ground vehicles, and YOU KNOW THEY DO, are they as concerned the ground vehicles will cause the same effect with their HOT combustion engines? Same same, so use same precautions.
 

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