Calling ALASKA : Anyone capture any footage of the Quake

PhantomWetSuits

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#1
Seems like everyone In Alaska has flips phones and upside down at that.
Be interesting to see something !
 
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#3
Alaska has six times more pilots per capita and 16 times more aircraft per capital than the rest of the USA. Maybe this is not the correct forum for the question. But who knows, maybe the internet is slow and something will show up.
 
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#5
I'm thinking that ground-based cameras would be taking more dramatic video of a quake. Part of the equation is all the noise that comes from a quake -- a Phantom camera wouldn't capture that. Then there's the camera shake. Nothing from the air would be that dramatic unless you shot buildings crumbling and falling down, or a road collapsing like we've seen in the media. THAT would be something, but as Timinator mentions, the quake was in darkness (8:30am with a sunrise in Anchorage being just shy of 10am). Lastly, someone would have had to have been there, actually in the air.
 
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#6
My son and his family live in Anchorage and I'm just glad that they're all safe and sound. I too lived in Anchorage for nearly 25 years and have been through my fair share of quakes. The last thing I'd looking for would be my P4P - plenty of time to take drone shots after things have subsided.

Take a look at the Anchorage TV stations for good video (KTUU.com for one) and also the local newspaper - Anchorage Daily News - adn.com.

If you've never visited Alaska,, I highly encourage you to do so. Take a Mavic or Parrot ANAFI, or other 'travel' drone, and also a stabilizer like the OSMO Mobile 2 or the new Pocket OSMO.

Rent a car and take the drive North to Fairbanks (about 350 miles) and also explore the Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage.

If you do plan to drive, go to your nearest bookstore (i.e. Barnes & Noble) and get a copy of "The Milepost" (in the store's map section) - several hundred pages of driving/sightseeing info. The Alaska highway system doesn't use addresses per se like we're used to in the lower 48 - instead, locations are mapped using milepose numbers. Likewise, the highways themselves may be shown on a standard road map as State Highway 3 for example. The highways are most often referred to by name - ie the "Parks Highway" goes between Anchorage and Fairbanks and the "Seward Highway" goes between Anchorage and Seward.


(suggestion: The Milepost is a paper bound book. Take it to a FedEx or UPS or office supply store and get it coil bound - makes it MUCH easier to use. The Milepost is published new every year and most Alaskans carry a copy of it in their vehicles).. Safe and earthquake-free travels!!

Food hint: Try and make it to the Lucky Wishbone at 5th and Karluk streets in Anchorage - some of the best chicken and burgers you'll ever eat - ANYWHERE!!
 
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#7
Great stuff Spokane Bob.

What would you recommend for time of year for such a driving trip? I would likely start from my home base of Seattle.

I remember when I lived up in the Seward area as a kid and we drove to Anchorage all year long, but that was back in the 60s and, well, driving OFF of the major highway was not something that I remember we ever doing, in winter.

Incidentally, we moved to Alaska just after the big one in '64. You could still see a lot of damage. My brother got sick and was hospitalized way up in Fairbanks, but even that hospital had cracks going up the wall of his room (with metal supports holding it all together).
 

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