14 CFR 107.31 Re: VLOS and Waivers

Joined
Jan 2, 2018
Messages
153
Reaction score
41
I read that some people regard the "Visual Line of Sight" to include use of the controller, and NOT necessarily mean that my eyes MUST SEE THE DRONE IN THE AIR SPACE.

Will people who have actually taken the certification class, or people who actually have the 107 cetification, please tell me what they mean by visual line of sight.

If it means that our drones must be physically visible by the naked eye, then are people asking for 107.31 waivers for flying their waypoint missions outside their visual line of sight? How are people navigating this part of the rule?

I plan on flying above tree lines, and the drone is "out of physical sight" pretty quickly. But I can manuever with the controller fairly well, with the use of maps / GPS, and keep the drone well above tree height. But I don't go too far out yet.

I am hoping to fly missions for a parcel mapping co. and will need to get the drone lic. and become insured. I am just curious if a waiver is needed, used, or difficult to receive, as this will hamper what I plan to do a bit.
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2017
Messages
445
Reaction score
230
Location
Colorado
Section 107.31 Visual line of sight aircraft operation.

(a) With vision that is unaided by any device other than corrective lenses, the remote pilot in command, the visual observer (if one is used), and the person manipulating the flight control of the small unmanned aircraft system must be able to see the unmanned aircraft throughout the entire flight

14 CFR 107.31 - Visual line of sight aircraft operation.

If you read the regulation as a 107 pilot AND a 101.41 hobbyist it is currently illegal to fly BVLOS
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Messages
1,187
Reaction score
483
Age
75
Location
Saltillo, Mississippi
I think most of us don’t understand this requirement, VLOS. I can see my Phantom out to 1,500 feet but have no idea what it is doing, which way it is going inless I watch it for a few seconds, and many other functions that are readily available from the display! I questioned this several months ago and got jumped on by many “do-gooders” who had never done anything wrong. I suggested much more control was available by using the on board technology rather than VLOS. I still believe this to be true but what do I know?
Thanks
Jim
WA5TEF.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lindsaybev
Joined
Apr 8, 2017
Messages
445
Reaction score
230
Location
Colorado
I think most of us don’t understand this requirement, VLOS. I can see my Phantom out to 1,500 feet but have no idea what it is doing, which way it is going inless I watch it for a few seconds, and many other functions that are readily available from the display! I questioned this several months ago and got jumped on by many “do-gooders” who had never done anything wrong. I suggested much more control was available by using the on board technology rather than VLOS. I still believe this to be true but what do I know?
Thanks
Jim
WA5TEF.
Jim - I'm just posting the regulation so I'm the messenger here but I understand your frustration. I know the industry's next big push is to allow BVLOS operations and some of your comments are the justification proponents are using to win this argument.
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2017
Messages
1,187
Reaction score
483
Age
75
Location
Saltillo, Mississippi
I posted this already but don’t see it: suppose I launch from a clearing in heavy forest. If I abide by this rule I can only fly up 399 feet and hover. The trees blocking direct viewing then I can’t fly but a few feet horizontally and then straight back down. Pretty limited I’d say!
Thanks
Jim
WA5TEF
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lindsaybev

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
138,808
Messages
1,432,927
Members
100,771
Latest member
Buggy Productions