Question about "Recreational Use" of UAS (FAA Rules)

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Hi, I'm a relatively new user (two years), and am confused about the new "rules" coming in the summer of 2019. According to the FAA website, unless I'm way off base, to be a drone pilot, there is a list of common sense items to follow, but the last one has me baffled. It states that a small UAS drone pilot needs to pass (every two years) "the initial aeronautical knowledge exam". Does this actually pertain to a casual recreational user or is this for obtaining the "Part 107" certificate?

I've been following the rules of the air for almost two years for recreational use, but this has me confused and concerned.

HELP!
 
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I totally understand the confusion.

The new rules just put out are for hobby pilots only. There will be newer ones coming too, but not yet. So there is nothing to worry about for 107 Pilots.

Yet.

There will be new 107 rules coming out, but they're a ways off. They still need to write the Night Ops and Over People Ops rules (the DAC will do some of this). But before that happen, Remote ID has to happen, and that's not even close.

Educating the UAS community is one of the topics of discussion next week at the AUVSI/FAA Symposium. We'll have FAA employees on our Podcast next week as well.

We'll get all of the new info out as soon as possible.
 
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Hi, I'm a relatively new user (two years), and am confused about the new "rules" coming in the summer of 2019. According to the FAA website, unless I'm way off base, to be a drone pilot, there is a list of common sense items to follow, but the last one has me baffled. It states that a small UAS drone pilot needs to pass (every two years) "the initial aeronautical knowledge exam". Does this actually pertain to a casual recreational user or is this for obtaining the "Part 107" certificate?

I've been following the rules of the air for almost two years for recreational use, but this has me confused and concerned.

HELP!
Yes the hobbyist we'll have to pass the test and maintain a copy of his test score showing that he passed on him when he flies. The test is not out yet as they had a hundred and eighty days to get this implemented from the time the law was passed.
 
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The test is not out yet as they had a hundred and eighty days to get this implemented from the time the law was passed.
The " FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018" became a Law on 10/05/2018. The 180 days has come and gone.
 
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I don't know of any new laws this year regarding recreational UAV's. Please inform me of the one you are thinking of.

In Section 349 of the 2018 Act are the new rules. I quote the part about a test:

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this section, the Administrator, in consultation with manufacturers of unmanned aircraft systems, other industry stakeholders, and community-based organizations, shall develop an aeronautical knowledge and safety test, which can then be administered electronically by the Administrator, a community-based organization, or a person designated by the Administrator. "

I think that you might be confusing the new guidance / rules / interpretation that the FAA has come out with recently about the new 2018 law vs the law itself.
 
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This law was passed in 2019, a few months ago. Is it retroactive for 2018, I dont know. What I do know is the test is not out yet and I was told a month or so ago that they had a hundred and eighty days to get it and it was effective as of this year. There has been several topics discussing the new laws and changes for hobbyist. One of those changes was that once you took the test you had to maintain a copy of your passing in the event you are ever asked for it by the appropriate legal authorities.
 
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Recreational Flyers – Interim Safety Guidance Available to Explain How, When and Where You Can Fly Your Drone
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued interim safety guidance for recreational flyers that reinforces recent changes to how, when and where users can fly drones for recreational purposes.

The FAA’s Advisory Circular explains the conditions users must comply with in order to fly under the exception for recreational flyers, and simplifies information in the Federal Register Notice.

This AC outlines eight conditions:

Fly strictly for recreational purposes.
Follow the safety guidelines of a community based organization.
Keep your drone within your line of sight, or within the visual line-of-sight of a visual observer who is co-located and in direct communication with you.
Operate in a manner that does not interfere with, and gives way to, any manned aircraft.
Do not fly in controlled airspace (around and above many airports) unless you are flying at a recreational flyer fixed site that has an agreement with the FAA.
Flight in controlled airspace is temporarily limited to these fixed fields. The FAA is upgrading the online system, known as LAANC (the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability), so that recreational operations can get automated airspace authorizations to fly in controlled airspace. This system is currently only available for certified Part 107 drone pilots.
Do not contact the local FAA Air Traffic facilities for airspace authorizations.
Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or "Class G" airspace.
Pass an aeronautical knowledge and safety test.
Register and externally mark your drone, and carry proof of registration with you.
Learn more about the rules you should follow to fly your drone safely.
 
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This law was passed in 2019, a few months ago.
The Act was singed into Law on Oct 5th, 2018. Since then here has been only guidance by the FAA. No new laws, no new published rules. No changes to 14 CFR Part 101 subsection E (Special Rule For Model Aircraft): eCFR — Code of Federal Regulations

Most of the official guidance has happened quite recently with the publication of the Advisory Circular AC 91-57-B published at the end of May AC 91-57B - Exception for Limited Recreational Operations of Unmanned Aircraft – Document Information Note: AC's are just that: Advisory . It is a published way to meet the rules that the FAA gives and if practiced, it's unlikely that you'll break a rule discussed in it. But they are not the only way to comply as they are non-binding.

There was also a publication in the Federal Record on May 17th regarding the FAA's implementation of the new Law into actual rules and regulations. Exception for Limited Recreational Operations of Unmanned Aircraft This would be the actual official guidence and directs of the FAA.

Regarding the test for recreation users, it states:
"Section 44809(g) requires the FAA to develop, in consultation with stakeholders, an aeronautical knowledge and safety test that can be administered electronically. This test is intended to demonstrate a recreational flyer's knowledge of aeronautical safety knowledge and rules for operating unmanned aircraft.

The FAA currently is developing an aeronautical knowledge and safety test and plans to engage stakeholders on its development through a public process.

The FAA acknowledges that satisfying this statutory condition is impossible until the FAA establishes the aeronautical knowledge and safety test. For the reasons discussed earlier in this document, the FAA has determined this condition will apply only after the FAA develops and makes available the knowledge and safety test. Accordingly, during this interim period, recreational flyers who adhere to the other seven conditions under section 44809(a), may use the exception for limited recreational unmanned aircraft operations.

The FAA will provide additional guidance and notice when the aeronautical knowledge and safety test is available and the date on which adherence to this condition is required."


That should answer the original question by PCgodUSA1
 

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