More 2019 Superbloom

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Nice imaging.
 
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I was also in Carizzo last week and found out how restrictive the 400ft limit is. The hills are covered with wildflowers but I could only fly part way up because of the limit.

Mr.G
 
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I was also in Carizzo last week and found out how restrictive the 400ft limit is. The hills are covered with wildflowers but I could only fly part way up because of the limit.

Mr.G
If you drove or hiked up to a higher elevation, perhaps at the base of those hills, your zero would be much higher and would make it possible to achieve your goal. I was there a few days ago and was well under 400 ft for this one and many other successful images.

carrrizohills1.jpg
 
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I understand what you are saying but for this image, couldn't start higher because of a barbwire fence.
DJI_0134.jpg
 
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When possible, you can hike or drive to a high point and fly down. The limit is above takeoff point, not above ground level.
Of course! As I said before I UNDERSTAND it is from take-off point. But this is a big restriction when you are trying to photograph in hills like at Carizzo.
 
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Of course! As I said before I UNDERSTAND it is from take-off point. But this is a big restriction when you are trying to photograph in hills like at Carizzo.
I usually acquire maps of where I'm planning to fly so that I can find public land and avoid private land when necessary. The DeLorme series of state maps is a good place to start because they are oriented toward recreation and so they show land ownership and public roads, though not always in great detail. Google maps and aeronautical charts don't show this.

Often, you can find public land or road access to a high point that is close enough to solve the problem. And remember that private landowners have no special ability to restrict the airspace over their land without an FAA designation of some kind -- so, generally speaking, you can take off and land where there is public access and still fly over private land. Of course, if you land or crash on private land without permission, you are SOL. And if you want the picture bad enough, you can always find the landowner and ask to permission to access and fly.
 

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