Lipo battery bags for phantom batteries

Joined
Apr 1, 2019
Messages
40
Reaction score
10
Are they really necessary? If they are why don’t DJI supply with each battery or are they just gimmicks? Just wondering what people’s thoughts are on the use of lipo bags? :) Do most people buy them? Do they stop batteries catching fire? Thanks
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2016
Messages
1,895
Reaction score
1,149
Location
Tucson, Arizona
More ways for you to spend your money. I carry mine around in the gray foam case with the rc and ac. As long as you pay attention to where they are and not allow them to get damaged, your good.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jim Canada
Joined
May 9, 2020
Messages
19
Reaction score
5
Age
74
Are they really necessary? If they are why don’t DJI supply with each battery or are they just gimmicks? Just wondering what people’s thoughts are on the use of lipo bags? :) Do most people buy them? Do they stop batteries catching fire? Thanks
They do not stop them from catching on fire. However, bags can save your house if they do. While it is unlikely that they will ignite, they do. When they ignite, the fire is VERY intense. (See this for an example:
)And despite what you may have been told, they do not have to be damaged and they do not have to have the terminals shorted to ignite. They can and do spontaneously ignite due to an arcing between one or more of the 4 cells. You may remember the problems with Samsung Note phones igniting on airplanes. While those are not the exact same as the Lithium Polymer (LiPo) drone batteries, both are Lithium Ion - and the Lithium Polymer (technically Lithium Ion Polymer) can be more disastrous if it ignites. For safety, I always put my drone batteries in a DOUBLE case.
 
Joined
Sep 6, 2018
Messages
1,373
Reaction score
817
Age
54
Location
Canada
Id say they are only necessary when storing for extended periods or for shipping. Otherwise, as said above, if you are using them they are safe in your case.
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2016
Messages
1,895
Reaction score
1,149
Location
Tucson, Arizona
Another thought would be.........
How many drone batteries are in use let’s say just in the US?
How many houses(or other structure)have ignited because of one of these batteries?
My guess would be that number is somewhat slim.
I’m not a worrier, I pay my insurance agent for that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jim Canada
Joined
Jul 9, 2019
Messages
89
Reaction score
66
Age
69
Location
Corbyville, Ontario
They do not stop them from catching on fire. However, bags can save your house if they do. While it is unlikely that they will ignite, they do. When they ignite, the fire is VERY intense. (See this for an example:
)And despite what you may have been told, they do not have to be damaged and they do not have to have the terminals shorted to ignite. They can and do spontaneously ignite due to an arcing between one or more of the 4 cells. You may remember the problems with Samsung Note phones igniting on airplanes. While those are not the exact same as the Lithium Polymer (LiPo) drone batteries, both are Lithium Ion - and the Lithium Polymer (technically Lithium Ion Polymer) can be more disastrous if it ignites. For safety, I always put my drone batteries in a DOUBLE case.
It is ALWAYS better to be safe than sorry. With so much information out there about the dangers and real consequences it makes me wonder why people value a few dollars more than they value their life, or home, or vehicle. To me it is similar to the same level of thinking as is given to smoking tobacco products. There is much information out there informing about the risks of smoking but a lot of people out there still deny the accuracy of the information, and there are still a lot of people out there dying from lung cancer caused by smoking. Some will even deny that it was caused by their smoking.

I keep mine in either lipo bags or sealable metal containers when being stored or transported. If something does go wrong, at least I've done my part and erred on the side of safety.
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
115
Reaction score
71
Age
60
I believe your required by law to place drone batteries in Lipo bags for air travel.
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2015
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,874
Location
Yorba Linda, CA
I believe your required by law to place drone batteries in Lipo bags for air travel.
That's inaccurate. You're required to individually protect the batteries from shorts. Nothing about lipo bags.

In my case I have a backpack with separate compartments for each battery, protecting them from touching anything lose in the bag, or each other. When traveling by air, your required to carry your batteries onboard, so if something happens to the batteries, it will be obvious to the attendants (smell and sight), and they are easily accessed to take care of the problem.

I've never heard of a drone battery fire occurring when carried onto an airplane. Has anyone else?
 
  • Like
Reactions: skymonkey
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
693
A myth or no myth the fact is, that they can catch on fire although it is very very rare in practice.
The main problem is that the burning battery can not be extinguished like an usual fire as it not need external oxygen for burning. All components which are necessary for maintain the fire are in the battery itself so you can't just throw something over the burning battery and think it will stop.
 

JeffreyS

Premium Pilot
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
726
Reaction score
809
It is believed, and mostly through federal investigation, that a fire on a dive boat near my home that killed 32 people six months ago, was caused by way too many lipo and lithium batteries as well as numerous power strips that were charging all kinds of electronics overnight. I'm sure that event made national news. Since then I use bags for batteries that I am charging in my vehicle and home, and keep my spares in bags when I am on road trips. Some batteries stay in the hard plastic case during travel. It is cheap insurance.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2016
Messages
1,370
Reaction score
586
Location
PL
If you don't need a lightweight transport, use steel ammo containers.

I'm using one for years. They're great. Sealed, so there won't be much fire, and you won't have to repaint everything due to smoke.
Lot of place - I'm fitting 10 Ph3 batteries in mine and there's still place for at least 10 more.
Good especially for transport within car. Sudden explosion and smoke behind you could lead to accident, with this you'll only head a "thumb!" in case one goes critical.
Have metal handle. Also they're cheap, at least in Poland. Have either "US Army" or "NATO" markings, so also look intimidating.

When I bought mine, at the same place I could buy maybe 3 of the poor anti-fire bags.

Note that lipos rarely do fire, they mostly make smoke. And a lot of it!
 
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
780
Reaction score
620
Location
Miami-Dade
That's inaccurate. You're required to individually protect the batteries from shorts. Nothing about lipo bags.

In my case I have a backpack with separate compartments for each battery, protecting them from touching anything lose in the bag, or each other. When traveling by air, your required to carry your batteries onboard, so if something happens to the batteries, it will be obvious to the attendants (smell and sight), and they are easily accessed to take care of the problem.

I've never heard of a drone battery fire occurring when carried onto an airplane. Has anyone else?

You are correct John. I assume airlines are required to carry fire extinguishers capable of extinguishing LiPO battery fires.

 
Joined
Jun 26, 2015
Messages
6,239
Reaction score
2,874
Location
Yorba Linda, CA
The main problem is that the burning battery can not be extinguished like an usual fire as it not need external oxygen for burning.
If a Class D extinguisher is not available, you can douse a lithium-metal fire with water to prevent the fire from spreading, but not stopping. For best results stopping a Li-ion fire, use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate), which works to extinguish similiar combustible fires.
 
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
780
Reaction score
620
Location
Miami-Dade
I've never heard of a drone battery fire occurring when carried onto an airplane. Has anyone else?


IMG_0809.jpg

IMG_0810.jpg

IMG_0811.jpg
 
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
780
Reaction score
620
Location
Miami-Dade
If a Class D extinguisher is not available, you can douse a lithium-metal fire with water to prevent the fire from spreading, but not stopping. For best results stopping a Li-ion fire, use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate), which works to extinguish similiar combustible fires.

Don’t leave out the bucket of sand John.
 
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
693
How does safety bags work, because the battery burns by itself even if it is in the bag?
 
  • Like
Reactions: JeffreyS

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
140,499
Messages
1,448,231
Members
102,289
Latest member
DanTucker