Links for new Canadian rules effective June 1st 2019

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#1
I thought I would create a thread with some helpful links regarding the new rules just announced this morning.

For those with really short attention spans:

Register your drone, take the exam, apply for a pilot certificate - advanced operations

Knowledge Requirements for the exam

For the whole shebang:

From the Flying your drone safely and legally - new rules page:
Flying your drone safely and legally (new rules)
These rules aren’t in effect until June 1, 2019. Take me to the current rules.

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From Transport Canada

Drones are aircraft—which makes you a pilot. When you fly your drone, you’re sharing the skies with other drones and aircraft. Before you fly, understand the rules you must follow and review our safety tips.

On this page
Legal requirements when flying drones
Drone pilots must follow the rules in the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs). Part IX – Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems contains most of the rules that apply to drones. You should read these regulations in full before you fly your drone for the first time.

Drone pilots must carry a valid drone pilot certificate and only fly drones that are marked and registered.

Respect all other laws
You must respect all other laws when flying your drone. We encourage you to read the following documents before you fly for the first time:

You must respect the privacy rights of others when you fly.

We investigate reports of unsafe flying. We may involve local police if you break other laws.

Fly your drone safely
It’s important that you fly your drone responsibly to avoid harming others. Here are the rules you need to follow.

Before you fly
  1. Understand your legal requirements when flying drones
  2. Understand the difference between basic and advanced operations
  3. Get the necessary knowledge requirements
  4. Get a drone pilot certificate
  5. Choose the right drone if you want to perform advanced operations
  6. Register your drone
  7. Follow your drone manufacturer’s instructions
  8. Survey the area where you will fly
    • Take note of any obstacles, such as buildings and power lines
While flying
To keep yourself and others safe, fly your drone:

  • where you can see it at all times
  • below 122 metres (400 feet) in the air
  • away from bystanders, at a minimum distance of 30 metres for basic operations
  • away from emergency operations and advertised events
    • Avoid forest fires, outdoor concerts and parades
  • away from airports and heliports
    • 5.6 kilometres (3 nautical miles) from airports
    • 1.9 kilometres (1 nautical mile) from heliports
  • far away from other aircraft
    • Don’t fly anywhere near airplanes, helicopters and other drones
Always respect the privacy of others while flying.

Penalties
You could face serious penalties, including fines and/or jail time, if you break the rules.

Fines for individuals
  • up to $1,000 for flying without a drone pilot certificate
  • up to $1,000 for flying unregistered or unmarked drones
  • up to $1,000 for flying where you are not allowed
  • up to $3,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk
Fines for corporations
  • up to $5,000 for flying without a drone pilot certificate
  • up to $5,000 for flying unregistered or unmarked drones
  • up to $5,000 for flying where you are not allowed
  • up to $15,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk
If you break more than one rule, you could receive multiple penalties.

Tips for first-time pilots
  • Make sure it is safe to fly (ask yourself, for example: are the batteries fully charged? Is it too cold or windy to fly?)
  • Fly your drone with someone who has flown a drone before
  • Fly your drone in an open space and away from people
  • Fly your drone close to the ground and at a low speed
  • Fly your drone during daylight and in good weather
Public liability insurance
We recommend buying public liability insurance for your drone. However, it is not required. Note that most standard home insurance policies do not cover the use of drones.

Useful terms to know
Drone and Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS)
We use the term “drone” on these pages to refer to any type of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS). There are a number of different terms for this technology. In Part IX of the Canadian Aviation Regulations, we use the term Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems to align with our international partners.

Visual-line-of-sight (VLOS)
Visual-line-of-sight means keeping your device in sight at all times without visual aid (for example, binoculars or video feed). This means not flying into clouds or fog, or behind trees, buildings or other (even partial) obstructions.

Bystander
Bystander refers to anyone that is not directly associated with operating the drone. Among others, this excludes the pilot and crew.

Related links
 
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#3
Here is the news release:
Minister Garneau unveils Canada’s new drone safety regulations
From: Transport Canada

News release
Drone pilots to register their drones and obtain a pilot certificate by June 1, 2019
January 9, 2019 Ottawa Transport Canada
Transport Canada is committed to enhancing aviation and public safety while encouraging innovation and economic growth in the drone sector. Today, the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, announced Canada’s new rules for remotely piloted aircraft systems, more commonly known as drones.
The new rules, which will come into force on June 1, 2019, apply to all drone pilots flying drones between 250 grams and 25 kilograms that are operated within the drone pilot’s visual-line-of-sight, regardless of whether the drone is flown for fun, work or research.
The new simplified rules reflect significant consultations with Canadians and the industry. The final regulations introduce two main categories of drone operation: basic and advanced. The categories are based on distance from bystanders and airspace rules.
Both categories have their own set of easy-to-follow rules that will require the drone pilot to:
  • register and mark the drone with its registration number;
  • pass an online exam and get a pilot certificate for basic or advanced operations;
  • be a minimum age of 14 for basic and 16 for advanced operations, unless supervised by a person having proper certificates;
  • stay below an altitude of 122 m (400 feet) above ground level; and
  • stay away from air traffic.
Only drone pilots who need to fly a drone outside the rules for basic or advanced operations will need to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC) before they fly.
Transport Canada encourages drone pilots to take the necessary time to review and fully understand the new rules for drones in Canada and to follow a course provided by a drone flight school before attempting to take an online exam or flight review.
Drone pilots will need to have their Pilot Certificate and proof of registration readily available when flying their drone as of June 1, 2019. This can mean having an electronic version available on their mobile device or carrying a printed copy.
Transport Canada has developed an improved, user-friendly website with information on the new regulations and helpful tools for all drone pilots available at: Canada.ca/drone-safety.
Transport Canada’s new drone services are available on our website. We invite drone pilots to create an account in the Drone Management Portal for easy access to these drone services at all times.
Until the new rules come into force on June 1, 2019, recreational drone pilots must continue to follow the rules of the Interim Order Respecting the Use of Model Aircraft and pilots using their drone for work or research must continue to follow the conditions of their Special Flight Operations Certificate.
All drone pilots are also subject to the Criminal Code as well as all provincial, territorial, and municipal laws governing areas such as privacy and trespassing. Endangering the safety of an aircraft is a serious offence. Anyone who violates the regulations could be subject to additional fines of up to $25,000 and/or prison. This applies to drones of any size used for any purpose.
Quotes
“We’ve listened closely to feedback from Canadians and have updated our regulations to balance practicality and the safe use of drones. Drones are part of an important economic sector with significant potential to improve lives and connect communities across the country. Our new regulations will create new opportunities for Canadians by establishing a safe and predictable regulatory environment where the industry can innovate and where recreational and non-recreational drone pilots can safely access Canadian airspace.”
The Honourable Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport
 
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#5
Wow, I was reading the knowledge regulations. Seemed deep? I still don’t see why a drone flying VLOS and under 400 ft. should have such complicated rules. Yes, do dumb things and you will have problems.
I’ll just buy an ultralight and carry my Nikon with me. Less rules and regulations.
 
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#7
The real key here will be enforcement. How is this actually going to be policed? I know they had talked in the past about having regular law enforcement do it but that can get complicated as we have seen in other jurisdictions where law enforcement aren't fully familiar with the regulations.
 
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#9
Link to the actual regs:

Canada Gazette, Part 2, Volume 153, Number 1: Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems)

Some interesting items:
No more subzero temperature flights (at least if you're a Phantom pilot)
901.31 No pilot shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft system unless it is operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Must have the instruction manual with you:
901.30 No pilot shall conduct the take-off or launch of a remotely piloted aircraft for which the manufacturer has provided a remotely piloted aircraft system operating manual unless the manual is immediately available to crew members at their duty stations.

Record Keeping - Flight log and Journey log required
01.48 (1) Every owner of a remotely piloted aircraft system shall keep the following records:

  • (a) a record containing the names of the pilots and other crew members who are involved in each flight and, in respect of the system, the time of each flight or series of flights; and
  • (b) a record containing the particulars of any mandatory action and any other maintenance action, modification or repair performed on the system, including
    • (i) the names of the persons who performed them,
    • (ii) the dates they were undertaken,
    • (iii) in the case of a modification, the manufacturer, model and a description of the part or equipment installed to modify the system, and
    • (iv) if applicable, any instructions provided to complete the work.
(2) Every owner of a remotely piloted aircraft system shall ensure that the records referred to in subsection (1) are made available to the Minister on request and are retained for a period of

  • (a) in the case of the records referred to in paragraph (1)(a), 12 months after the day on which they are created; and
  • (b) in the case of the records referred to in paragraph (1)(b), 24 months after the day on which they are created.
(3) Every owner of a remotely piloted aircraft system who transfers ownership of the system to another person shall, at the time of transfer, also deliver to that person all of the records referred to in paragraph (1)(b).

No flying after the barbecue (12hr alcohol rule)
Fitness of Crew Members
901.19 (1)
No person shall act as a crew member of a remotely piloted aircraft system if the person

  • (a) is suffering or is likely to suffer from fatigue; or
  • (b) is otherwise unfit to perform properly the person’s duties.
(2) No person shall act as a crew member of a remotely piloted aircraft system

  • (a) within 12 hours after consuming an alcoholic beverage;
  • (b) while under the influence of alcohol; or
  • (c) while using any drug that impairs the person’s faculties to the extent that aviation safety or the safety of any person is endangered or likely to be endangered.
Will post more later.
 
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#10
Very interesting changes. I like that we will now have to register our AC and pass an exam. I also saw that night flying will be allowed with the appropriate lighting installed. Slightly higher ceiling is nice too.
 
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#11
250gms? May not intended to be, but it's essentially a Phantom cull. The good news is that it may lead to more personnel being hired to deal with all the modalities/legalities/insurance snafus and otherwise. To date it is very hard to get someone who can handle all technical/legal/insurance questions concisely and in both verbal and written format!
 
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#12
up to $3,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk, up to $15,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk
This is a bit ridiculous! Why not make it $100,000 fine regardless of your reason for flying, ….. and death by electric chair! To have a different fine depending on your vocation, when/where lives are at stake and after authorized to receive one's pilot certificate … seems rather inadequate to me.
 
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#13
$1000 for not having your pilot certificate and/or registration on your person while flying is ridiculous. The fine isnt that high for not having your drivers license on you while driving!
 
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#14
Government bureaucracy speaks! Which means confusion, inefficiency, cost and injustice.
Logic and simplicity should prevail. Has a hobbyist kill anyone with their drone yet?
 
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#15
As someone already mentioned, there are fewer rules and regs required when operating an ultralight aircraft. My issue at present is that Transport in not giving sources for the specific knowledge requirements, only sources for general knowledge as required for general and commercial aviation, which seems a bit of an overkill. Transport does suggest taking a courses from "drone schools", which makes it obvious that these proposed rules and regs have probably been made in consultation with these schools, which is an extreme conflict of interest. Transport must provide a adequate knowledge base source.
 
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#16
I can't see them doing it for any older models and certainly not Phantom series or smaller.
I certainly hope they do. Many a commercial operators use the P4 and I suspect they sell a fair number generally. It would seem like a bad PR move on their part. Whatever they decide I hope they don't wait until 2 weeks before the deadline :)
 
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#17
As someone already mentioned, there are fewer rules and regs required when operating an ultralight aircraft. My issue at present is that Transport in not giving sources for the specific knowledge requirements, only sources for general knowledge as required for general and commercial aviation, which seems a bit of an overkill. Transport does suggest taking a courses from "drone schools", which makes it obvious that these proposed rules and regs have probably been made in consultation with these schools, which is an extreme conflict of interest. Transport must provide a adequate knowledge base source.
I don't think it is a conflict of interest at all. There was wide consultation open to individuals and organizations alike and it only makes sense from a training perspective that they are included.
 
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#19
You are missing the point of my statement. Where is the comprehensive knowledge base source?
From Knowledge Requirements for Pilots of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems 250 g up to and including 25 kg, Operating within Visual Line-of-Sight (VLOS) (TP 15263) - Transport Canada

Recommended study material
Transport Canada publications (TP), including the following, may be purchased from retailers, or at the following web site: Publications and Videos - Transport Canada.

The Study Guide for the Radiotelephone Restricted Operator Certificate - Aeronautical (RIC-21) is available free of charge from district offices of Industry Canada - Examinations and Radio Licensing (http://www.strategis.gc.ca).

Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) are available online at:
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-96-433/index.html

NAV CANADA publications, including the following, may be purchased from retailers, or at the following web site:
NAV CANADA: Products and Services - Aeronautical Information Products

  • VFR Navigation Charts (VNC )/VFR Terminal Area Charts (VTA )
  • Canada Flight Supplement
The NAV CANADA VFR Phraseology guide is available for download at
https://www.navcanada.ca/EN/media/Publications/VFR Phraseology.pdf

Some NAV CANADA regions have developed Best Practices for dealing with RPAS. Those documents are available for download at
https://flitelab.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/vr-fir-uav-best-practices-vruav-2015-final.pdf
A copy of the Vancouver Flight Information Region UAV Best Practices can be requested by e-mail from [email protected]

Information on the Transportation of Dangerous Goods is available from Transport Canada.
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Program - Transport Canada

Text books and other publications produced by commercial publishers can be obtained through local flying training organization, bookstores and similar sources.
 
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#20
From Knowledge Requirements for Pilots of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems 250 g up to and including 25 kg, Operating within Visual Line-of-Sight (VLOS) (TP 15263) - Transport Canada

Recommended study material
Transport Canada publications (TP), including the following, may be purchased from retailers, or at the following web site: Publications and Videos - Transport Canada.

The Study Guide for the Radiotelephone Restricted Operator Certificate - Aeronautical (RIC-21) is available free of charge from district offices of Industry Canada - Examinations and Radio Licensing (http://www.strategis.gc.ca).

Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) are available online at:
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-96-433/index.html

NAV CANADA publications, including the following, may be purchased from retailers, or at the following web site:
NAV CANADA: Products and Services - Aeronautical Information Products

  • VFR Navigation Charts (VNC )/VFR Terminal Area Charts (VTA )
  • Canada Flight Supplement
The NAV CANADA VFR Phraseology guide is available for download at
https://www.navcanada.ca/EN/media/Publications/VFR Phraseology.pdf

Some NAV CANADA regions have developed Best Practices for dealing with RPAS. Those documents are available for download at
https://flitelab.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/vr-fir-uav-best-practices-vruav-2015-final.pdf
A copy of the Vancouver Flight Information Region UAV Best Practices can be requested by e-mail from [email protected]

Information on the Transportation of Dangerous Goods is available from Transport Canada.
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Program - Transport Canada

Text books and other publications produced by commercial publishers can be obtained through local flying training organization, bookstores and similar sources.

Never mind, you are not reading what i wrote in the first place.
 

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