Exact temperatures of White Balance Presets?

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Phantom 4 Advanced - Does anyone know the actual color temperatures DJI uses for the white balance presets, particularly Sunny and Cloudy? For example, what manually set temperature is the exact same as the "Sunny" preset? 5000k? Same with "Cloudy" - is it 6500k? Many thanks.
 
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Phantom 4 Advanced - Does anyone know the actual color temperatures DJI uses for the white balance presets, particularly Sunny and Cloudy? For example, what manually set temperature is the exact same as the "Sunny" preset? 5000k? Same with "Cloudy" - is it 6500k? Many thanks.
Hello ou812 - I like your question; never thought about it myself. I am currently using, or experimenting with Custom WB 6500K, which I find in the winter snows to reproduce realistic white representing the snow.
 
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6500 is rather bluish but for snow it is OK bacause it better reproduces the cold. For other environments I would rather use 5000 or less. But everything depends of the taste.
 
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6500 is rather bluish but for snow it is OK bacause it better reproduces the cold. For other environments I would rather use 5000 or less. But everything depends of the taste.
Andy9 - Thanks for your input. Not knowing much about Custom WB, I simply have been trying to find the correct 'whites', using Kelvin temperature, for the season. In fact, the more I read about it - some say use an 18% gray card to set the WB; others say to use the presets for Daylight, Sunny, etc. but none of these during the winter months with snow on the ground give realistic white snow. Even WB/Kelvin temperature charts do not agree or give ranges.

Also, during mid-day (11am-1pm) even with cloudy skies, the white of the snow looks accurate to me.
 
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The most important for the art photography is wether you like it or no.
The light is continously changing during the day and an exact value is hard to preset. For the snow scenes it is important not to underexpose the picture. Autoexpose function generally tends to underexpose the snow. Put exp to one or one and half step up for the snow and it'll be OK.
 
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The most important for the art photography is wether you like it or no.
The light is continously changing during the day and an exact value is hard to preset. For the snow scenes it is important not to underexpose the picture. Autoexpose function generally tends to underexpose the snow. Put exp to one or one and half step up for the snow and it'll be OK.
Thank you Andy9 for the new info. Currently, I am looking for realism; then will proceed to enhancement such as HDR.
Another question: does it make sense to use an 18% gray card on the ground before takeoff to estimate the Aerial White Balance?
 
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Nowadays when almost everything can be done in post, I think that grey cards are a bit out of date.
It may be useful in a studio environment. On the field is not practical.
 
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6500 is rather bluish but for snow it is OK bacause it better reproduces the cold. For other environments I would rather use 5000 or less. But everything depends of the taste.
I’m in the middle. I also find 6500 or even 6000 too warm and usually set my WB at 5700 for sunny days. That’s with my P4P v2
 
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Phantom 4 Advanced - Does anyone know the actual color temperatures DJI uses for the white balance presets, particularly Sunny and Cloudy? For example, what manually set temperature is the exact same as the "Sunny" preset? 5000k? Same with "Cloudy" - is it 6500k? Many thanks.
Looks like the posted replies drifted away from your original question. The "adjust in post" response is also a path to finding your answer. Go shoot in the different WB settings, then read the EXIF data on the photos. If your image editing software won't show you the whole slate of exif data, download the free executable "exiftool(-k)". Drag/drop any photo or video onto the icon for the executable file, and it'll open up a ton of data recorded by the camera for that image, including the color temperature used plus a whole bunch of other exciting stuff like your gps coordinates, altitude, heading, camera pitch, time, etc

I shoot in RAW, and the color temp during the capture does not affect the RAW image, so I don't worry much about getting it just right at the capture. The color temp in the exif data is used by the editing software in converting to jpg's, but most of the better photo editors will let you adjust the color temp during the post-capture editing anyway. Of course if you capture in jpg, that WB setting will affect your results. To get the best results, shoot RAW and adjust in post.

Apologies for the long winded reply. Hope something in there helps. Regards............... Bob R.
 
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Looks like the posted replies drifted away from your original question. The "adjust in post" response is also a path to finding your answer. Go shoot in the different WB settings, then read the EXIF data on the photos. If your image editing software won't show you the whole slate of exif data, download the free executable "exiftool(-k)". Drag/drop any photo or video onto the icon for the executable file, and it'll open up a ton of data recorded by the camera for that image, including the color temperature used plus a whole bunch of other exciting stuff like your gps coordinates, altitude, heading, camera pitch, time, etc
Many thanks, Bob. Yes, the replies drifted off-topic so I hadn't even checked my post in a while. I looked at some recent images from my P4A with white balance set to the "Sunny". When I view the EXIF data in XnView it only lists the white balance as "Manual(1)" and not a temperature. I tried downloading exiftool (several variations) but couldn't get it to show any info so I'll have to keep working on that program to see what I'm doing wrong. I might try to see if there are any other EXIF programs that will give a different result. Thanks again!
 
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Many thanks, Bob. Yes, the replies drifted off-topic so I hadn't even checked my post in a while. I looked at some recent images from my P4A with white balance set to the "Sunny". When I view the EXIF data in XnView it only lists the white balance as "Manual(1)" and not a temperature. I tried downloading exiftool (several variations) but couldn't get it to show any info so I'll have to keep working on that program to see what I'm doing wrong. I might try to see if there are any other EXIF programs that will give a different result. Thanks again!
Do you process your files in Lightroom or Photoshop?
While it’s not exactly the same as what DJI says is your Kelvin temperature, it will give you a reading when you initially open it up as shot in the white balance Tab.
Shoot raw files of the same scene in each of the different presets and then open them up in Lightroom or Photoshop and see what it says. It’ll give you at least an idea of the baseline that DJI thinks should be “Sunny“ or “cloudy“, etc.
as I said earlier I’ve tried the sunny preset and sunny days and usually find ,from my phantom 4 pro, the preset to be warmer than I like and I almost always set it at 5600or 5700 on a sunny day, then tweak it and post to the way I like it. I always shoot raw files for stills so that’s not an issue I just want to get it close as I can to how I like it.

It is important for video or JPEG‘s to get as close as possible to how you like it when you shoot so you lose the least amount of quality trying to adjust it later on.
 
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I'm not processing my photos at all. I'm shooting construction progress videos and JPEGs for mapping/DEM. The site is in the mountains where it's almost always cloudy, like a rain forest. I was using the "Cloudy" preset for both video and photos but things were looking a bit too yellow. "Sunny" is better but I'd like a manual number between the two presets and was just curious if anyone knew the actual temps for the two presets so that I could first try a number exactly halfway between. I'll just have to do some trial and error with manual temps to see what's best. Thanks, all.
 

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