Drones now spies??

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SECURITY
Chinese drones may be spies: US intelligence agency warning
Jamie Seidel, News Corp Australia Network
May 21, 2019 12:58pm
First it was Huawei phones. Now it’s Chinese drones. The US Department of Homeland Security has issued a warning that our little spies in the sky may be double-agents.
It says they are being used to deliver ‘spyware’ to networks and redirect sensitive data.
An overnight alert from DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency states drones are a “potential risk to an organisation’s information” because they can “contain components that can compromise your data and share your information on a server accessed beyond the company itself.”
Unlike black-listed Chinese phone and telecommunications company Huawei, no specific manufacturer has been named. But China is the world’s largest manufacturer of hobbyist, commercial — and military — drones.
Foreign intelligence agencies could identify drones operating in sensitive areas, experts warn. The cameras on these drones — be they nearby hobbyists, security services or even maintenance assessors — can be accessed. But they could also be used to deliver ‘spyware’ into sensitive networks.
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A drone photographs young woman relaxing on tropical beach in the Philippines. Such privacy concerns are now extending to national security. Picture: iStock
“The United States government has strong concerns about any technology product that takes American data into the territory of an authoritarian state that permits its intelligence services to have unfettered access to that data or otherwise abuses that access,” the alert says.
“Those concerns apply with equal force to certain Chinese-made (unmanned aircraft systems)-connected devices capable of collecting and transferring potentially revealing data about their operations and the individuals and entities operating them, as China imposes unusually stringent obligations on its citizens to support national intelligence activities.”
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The alert warns: “They can contain components that can compromise your data and share your information on a server accessed beyond the company itself. Other concerns are that an organisation is susceptible to data theft if the drone is transmitting unencrypted data or, more broadly, that a drone could increase the risk of a network being breached.”
The DHS has ordered drone users — particularly those who provide services that may affect ‘critical national functions’ — to “be cautious when purchasing” drones from China, and to take precautionary steps like turning off the device’s internet connection and removing secure digital cards”. It also warns users to “understand how to properly operate and limit your device’s access to networks (and prevent) theft of information.”
The HMB Endeavour photographed by drone at a dock in Nouma. Drone photos and video from sensitive areas could be being redirected to China. Picture: Toby Zerna
It’s not the first time high-tech equipment has been accused of redirecting senstive material back to the government of its manufacturers. In 2017, Norway accused the US of accessing flight data collected by its newly delivered F-35 strike fighters.
It’s also not the first time the US has issued an alert about Chinese drones.
In 2017, the US Army ordered all Chinese-made drones be recalled from its ranks to be destroyed. It alleged they had provided the means for intelligence operatives to access infrastructure and operational data.
According to Reuters, the Chinese firm DJI has issued a statement saying “the security of our technology has been independently verified by the US government and leading US businesses.” It also says users have control over how data is collected, stored and transmitted.
 
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ianzone

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SECURITY
Chinese drones may be spies: US intelligence agency warning
Jamie Seidel, News Corp Australia Network
May 21, 2019 12:58pm
First it was Huawei phones. Now it’s Chinese drones. The US Department of Homeland Security has issued a warning that our little spies in the sky may be double-agents.
It says they are being used to deliver ‘spyware’ to networks and redirect sensitive data.
An overnight alert from DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency states drones are a “potential risk to an organisation’s information” because they can “contain components that can compromise your data and share your information on a server accessed beyond the company itself.”
Unlike black-listed Chinese phone and telecommunications company Huawei, no specific manufacturer has been named. But China is the world’s largest manufacturer of hobbyist, commercial — and military — drones.
Foreign intelligence agencies could identify drones operating in sensitive areas, experts warn. The cameras on these drones — be they nearby hobbyists, security services or even maintenance assessors — can be accessed. But they could also be used to deliver ‘spyware’ into sensitive networks.
RELATED CONTENT
[IMG alt="Image Supplied by Transport for NSW
Metro Trains prepare for opening day of the Sydney Metro Northwest at Rouse Hill station.
Located directly outside the Rouse Hill Town Centre and above the existing T-way, the new Rouse Hill Station will service this growing retail and entertainment precinct."]https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/thumbnail/5864227efaa572a8c9a30f2d8e0e29ca[/IMG]
Metro northwest opening next week
Metro northwest opening next week

General pictures of people using their phones, j-walking and listening to music while crossing the streets in the Brisbane CBD, Brisbane Tuesday 20th November 2018 Picture AAP/David Clark

The city pushing to ban texting
The city pushing to ban texting


A drone photographs young woman relaxing on tropical beach in the Philippines. Such privacy concerns are now extending to national security. Picture: iStock
“The United States government has strong concerns about any technology product that takes American data into the territory of an authoritarian state that permits its intelligence services to have unfettered access to that data or otherwise abuses that access,” the alert says.
“Those concerns apply with equal force to certain Chinese-made (unmanned aircraft systems)-connected devices capable of collecting and transferring potentially revealing data about their operations and the individuals and entities operating them, as China imposes unusually stringent obligations on its citizens to support national intelligence activities.”
EXPLORE MORE:
Just how ‘loyal’ will Australian Air Force AI drones be?
Now the US wants to put armed drone satellites in space


The alert warns: “They can contain components that can compromise your data and share your information on a server accessed beyond the company itself. Other concerns are that an organisation is susceptible to data theft if the drone is transmitting unencrypted data or, more broadly, that a drone could increase the risk of a network being breached.”
The DHS has ordered drone users — particularly those who provide services that may affect ‘critical national functions’ — to “be cautious when purchasing” drones from China, and to take precautionary steps like turning off the device’s internet connection and removing secure digital cards”. It also warns users to “understand how to properly operate and limit your device’s access to networks (and prevent) theft of information.”
The HMB Endeavour photographed by drone at a dock in Nouma. Drone photos and video from sensitive areas could be being redirected to China. Picture: Toby Zerna
It’s not the first time high-tech equipment has been accused of redirecting senstive material back to the government of its manufacturers. In 2017, Norway accused the US of accessing flight data collected by its newly delivered F-35 strike fighters.
It’s also not the first time the US has issued an alert about Chinese drones.
In 2017, the US Army ordered all Chinese-made drones be recalled from its ranks to be destroyed. It alleged they had provided the means for intelligence operatives to access infrastructure and operational data.
According to Reuters, the Chinese firm DJI has issued a statement saying “the security of our technology has been independently verified by the US government and leading US businesses.” It also says users have control over how data is collected, stored and transmitted.
Might be same as this posted early,,,,sorry not know how to copy and paste link so took picture,,,we'll I hope it same story,,,,yip same it got posted under news
Screenshot_20190521-171656.jpg
 

ianzone

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Just hit the papers here (again) so I thought I'd post.
Personally I think it's paranoia on the govts part.
For this reason I won't own smart tv,it's probly watching you,,now I'm paranoid ha,phantom clever enough for my liking,
 
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Just what happens when the government get's involved in a HOBBY,Thank you idiots for flying in the clouds,and around airports where you didn't belong!!!!!!!!!
 
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