DJI in Trouble?

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I read this today in a different forum. I don't know th author, but found this believable, and troubling:
"
This will be posted in the next few days- the author is still working on it. But many employees have changed their linkedIn profiles to record the fact that they were laid off:DJI is a privately-held company and, unlike Amazon or Apple, it does not need to provide quarterly statements or annual reports to the public. The absence of such reports makes it near impossible for outsiders to get a sense of how the company performs. Especially after recent rumors of layoffs and drastic reorganization, many people, including myself, have been wondering what is going on with DJI. To find out more, I have reached out to several people close to the DJI organization, and I have been contacted by former DJI employees to help create a clearer picture of what is happening within DJI.First DJI's sales and profits tankedInformation we received from DJI insiders, and people closely related to the company, indicate that sales for March may be down by as much as 80% year-over-year. Profits are reportedly down even more. The dramatic decrease in sales is directly linked to the rapid spreading coronavirus, although sales had been down already due to the implemented trade tariffs and the increasing geopolitical tensions between the U.S and China. It seems that DJI saw the coronavirus as an excellent opportunity to clean their house and reorganize its business, resulting in a large number of layoffs across its organization.The layoffs appear not only to be limited to the U.S. offices of DJI. We have received reports of similar organizational changes in Europe and in Shenzhen, China.In the U.S., most of the layoffs seem to have impacted the Burbank, California office, where reportedly mostly older and Caucasian employees were let go. Other DJI offices in Cerritos, CA, Palo Alto, CA, and New York, NY, have seen layoffs as well.Most of the layoffs in the U.S., during which about 30% of total staff lost their jobs, took place unceremoniously around March 27th. A second round, however, is rumored to take place around April 25th, which may result in about half the total U.S. staff having lost their jobs."By May 1st, DJI will have laid-off over 50% of U.S. staff. This is support staff, repair staff, marketing staff, and software engineering staff - across all divisions in all U.S. sites from Burbank to Cerritos to Palo Alto to NYC," said a senior legal adviser to DJI who has direct firsthand knowledge. "Large quantities of layoffs have occurred internationally, and more will follow as well."The Cerritos offices are DJI's primary repair and maintenance facility for the North American market. Even though select repair centers in Canada also perform basic repairs, any issues related to flight log decryption or analysis are dealt with in California or back in Shenzhen, China.In Burbank, CA, where DJI's marketing and sales operations are based, as many as 20 out of 40 employees reportedly lost their jobs. Some of these positions are allegedly now filled by ex-Huawei employees.DJI's New York offices are much smaller, housing only about 15-20 people. About five people reportedly lost their jobs at this location.Many of DJI's long term partners and dealers did not receive any upfront warning about the changes that were about to take place in the organization, leaving many of them wondering what had happened to their account managers.One former employee said that "DJI terminated 30% of [its] employees with any advance notice, with only a few days left till the end of the month and end of health insurance coverage, during the worst pandemic that has hit the world in recent years."DJI's "heavy-handed and unprofessional approach" to the layoffs saw people being escorted out of the buildings by security and without any severance packages. The same senior legal adviser, I quoted earlier, said:"DJI showed a remarkable lack of empathy and professionalism in discarding some very loyal employees. Even though economically DJI is seeing a massive reduction in revenue and had to reduce employment positions, the way they handled this was unconscionable and reflects in such a bad way on the culture of this company. It isn't cultural as relating to China- because we deal with many other massive Asian companies. It is cultural to DJI."Return DJI's drone hardware or else...Some of the former employees were asked to return any drone equipment and other hardware belonging to DJI within a week of receiving their termination notice. This request was nearly impossible to comply with, given the coronavirus lockdown situation in New York and California. Allegedly, some former employees were threatened with law enforcement seizure and legal action for 'theft' of company property, simply because they were unable to transport significant amounts of drone hardware back to the offices within the limited timeframe provided by DJI.The situation at DJI's head offices in Shenzhen, China, is not much better apparently. Many of the drone makers employees, half of whom are still working from home, were asked to come into the offices for a meeting. After the layoffs were announced and after handing over any equipment, they were cut off from work email and escorted out of the building. The layoffs occurred across DJI's consumer, enterprise, and agriculture departments.While we do not have any specific information about any layoffs in Europe, it seems that they did not escape unscathed.DJI diversifies its product offering to offset diminishing drone salesAs we have seen a dramatic slow down in drone sales over the last two years, it comes as no surprise that DJI has been looking to diversify its product offering. The company has had the Ronin-S, the Osmo, and the Osmo Mobile products for some time. Still, more recently they added the Osmo Pocket, Robomaster S1, Osmo Action, and made a big push into the LiDAR market with its subsidiary LIVOX.Frank Wang has allegedly hired a Huawei consultant to advise him on how to restructure DJI in these turbulent times. In combination with China now having become DJI's largest market, this has led to more Chinese employees being pushed into strategic positions within the company. Many international employees fear that with these changes, concerns in the U.S. about DJI's treatment of data security might no longer receive the attention they deserve. DJI's strategic focus now seems to be on producing good hardware and less so on offering the services and software that customers in Europe and North America are asking for.Mario Rebello's recent departure from DJI is an example of how things have changed within DJI. During his time with the drone maker in North America, Rebello was very focused on convincing the various departments of the U.S. government that DJI drones could be safely used. The company worked closely together with the Department of the Interior to develop a special 'Government Edition' that would make it impossible for certain drones to transmit any information over the internet and thus possibly back to China.Besides having hired a Huawei consultant, DJI's founder Frank Wang has allegedly brought a number of ex-employees from shuttered Huawei U.S. offices into DJI's Burbank location. Many of DJI's international staff oppose this move as Huawei's influence and a poor approach to U.S.-China relation has caused their company to be shut out of the U.S. market. And most believe that it would be best for DJI to distance itself from any Huawei association in light of the current geopolitical tension.We have received information that Mario Rebello will likely not be the last high-ranking U.S. executive to leave DJI, as reportedly four more senior people are looking to exit the organization in the near future.DroneXL's takeThe layoffs and overall changes in the organization, make you wonder what will be in store for DJI in the next few years. Specifically, in the U.S. market, where trade relations with China have been very tense. Will enthusiasts and pilots of unmanned aircraft, be able to buy DJI drones going forward. I think so, especially with DJI's recent announcement, but if there ever was a time for an American drone company to get its share of the market now seems to be an ideal time. Skydio? Impossible Aerospace? Anybody else?Almost all of the information has been presented to me by anonymous sources. These include former DJI employees as well as people who have been working closely for a significant time with the drone maker. I have tried my best to cross-reference the information I received and feel confident that it provides an accurate picture of what is currently happening at DJI.If you happen to be one of the people who have lost their job as a result of DJI's reorganization and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to me at: xxxxxxxxxxx"
 
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Its more than DJI in trouble at the moment it’s all over
with this pandemic. People all over are getting laid off.
Sorry didn’t read but enough to see all I wanted.
I sure don’t see this as news worthy but will leave it.
 

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I read this today in a different forum. I don't know th author, but found this believable, and troubling:
"
This will be posted in the next few days- the author is still working on it. But many employees have changed their linkedIn profiles to record the fact that they were laid off:DJI is a privately-held company and, unlike Amazon or Apple, it does not need to provide quarterly statements or annual reports to the public. The absence of such reports makes it near impossible for outsiders to get a sense of how the company performs. Especially after recent rumors of layoffs and drastic reorganization, many people, including myself, have been wondering what is going on with DJI. To find out more, I have reached out to several people close to the DJI organization, and I have been contacted by former DJI employees to help create a clearer picture of what is happening within DJI.First DJI's sales and profits tankedInformation we received from DJI insiders, and people closely related to the company, indicate that sales for March may be down by as much as 80% year-over-year. Profits are reportedly down even more. The dramatic decrease in sales is directly linked to the rapid spreading coronavirus, although sales had been down already due to the implemented trade tariffs and the increasing geopolitical tensions between the U.S and China. It seems that DJI saw the coronavirus as an excellent opportunity to clean their house and reorganize its business, resulting in a large number of layoffs across its organization.The layoffs appear not only to be limited to the U.S. offices of DJI. We have received reports of similar organizational changes in Europe and in Shenzhen, China.In the U.S., most of the layoffs seem to have impacted the Burbank, California office, where reportedly mostly older and Caucasian employees were let go. Other DJI offices in Cerritos, CA, Palo Alto, CA, and New York, NY, have seen layoffs as well.Most of the layoffs in the U.S., during which about 30% of total staff lost their jobs, took place unceremoniously around March 27th. A second round, however, is rumored to take place around April 25th, which may result in about half the total U.S. staff having lost their jobs."By May 1st, DJI will have laid-off over 50% of U.S. staff. This is support staff, repair staff, marketing staff, and software engineering staff - across all divisions in all U.S. sites from Burbank to Cerritos to Palo Alto to NYC," said a senior legal adviser to DJI who has direct firsthand knowledge. "Large quantities of layoffs have occurred internationally, and more will follow as well."The Cerritos offices are DJI's primary repair and maintenance facility for the North American market. Even though select repair centers in Canada also perform basic repairs, any issues related to flight log decryption or analysis are dealt with in California or back in Shenzhen, China.In Burbank, CA, where DJI's marketing and sales operations are based, as many as 20 out of 40 employees reportedly lost their jobs. Some of these positions are allegedly now filled by ex-Huawei employees.DJI's New York offices are much smaller, housing only about 15-20 people. About five people reportedly lost their jobs at this location.Many of DJI's long term partners and dealers did not receive any upfront warning about the changes that were about to take place in the organization, leaving many of them wondering what had happened to their account managers.One former employee said that "DJI terminated 30% of [its] employees with any advance notice, with only a few days left till the end of the month and end of health insurance coverage, during the worst pandemic that has hit the world in recent years."DJI's "heavy-handed and unprofessional approach" to the layoffs saw people being escorted out of the buildings by security and without any severance packages. The same senior legal adviser, I quoted earlier, said:"DJI showed a remarkable lack of empathy and professionalism in discarding some very loyal employees. Even though economically DJI is seeing a massive reduction in revenue and had to reduce employment positions, the way they handled this was unconscionable and reflects in such a bad way on the culture of this company. It isn't cultural as relating to China- because we deal with many other massive Asian companies. It is cultural to DJI."Return DJI's drone hardware or else...Some of the former employees were asked to return any drone equipment and other hardware belonging to DJI within a week of receiving their termination notice. This request was nearly impossible to comply with, given the coronavirus lockdown situation in New York and California. Allegedly, some former employees were threatened with law enforcement seizure and legal action for 'theft' of company property, simply because they were unable to transport significant amounts of drone hardware back to the offices within the limited timeframe provided by DJI.The situation at DJI's head offices in Shenzhen, China, is not much better apparently. Many of the drone makers employees, half of whom are still working from home, were asked to come into the offices for a meeting. After the layoffs were announced and after handing over any equipment, they were cut off from work email and escorted out of the building. The layoffs occurred across DJI's consumer, enterprise, and agriculture departments.While we do not have any specific information about any layoffs in Europe, it seems that they did not escape unscathed.DJI diversifies its product offering to offset diminishing drone salesAs we have seen a dramatic slow down in drone sales over the last two years, it comes as no surprise that DJI has been looking to diversify its product offering. The company has had the Ronin-S, the Osmo, and the Osmo Mobile products for some time. Still, more recently they added the Osmo Pocket, Robomaster S1, Osmo Action, and made a big push into the LiDAR market with its subsidiary LIVOX.Frank Wang has allegedly hired a Huawei consultant to advise him on how to restructure DJI in these turbulent times. In combination with China now having become DJI's largest market, this has led to more Chinese employees being pushed into strategic positions within the company. Many international employees fear that with these changes, concerns in the U.S. about DJI's treatment of data security might no longer receive the attention they deserve. DJI's strategic focus now seems to be on producing good hardware and less so on offering the services and software that customers in Europe and North America are asking for.Mario Rebello's recent departure from DJI is an example of how things have changed within DJI. During his time with the drone maker in North America, Rebello was very focused on convincing the various departments of the U.S. government that DJI drones could be safely used. The company worked closely together with the Department of the Interior to develop a special 'Government Edition' that would make it impossible for certain drones to transmit any information over the internet and thus possibly back to China.Besides having hired a Huawei consultant, DJI's founder Frank Wang has allegedly brought a number of ex-employees from shuttered Huawei U.S. offices into DJI's Burbank location. Many of DJI's international staff oppose this move as Huawei's influence and a poor approach to U.S.-China relation has caused their company to be shut out of the U.S. market. And most believe that it would be best for DJI to distance itself from any Huawei association in light of the current geopolitical tension.We have received information that Mario Rebello will likely not be the last high-ranking U.S. executive to leave DJI, as reportedly four more senior people are looking to exit the organization in the near future.DroneXL's takeThe layoffs and overall changes in the organization, make you wonder what will be in store for DJI in the next few years. Specifically, in the U.S. market, where trade relations with China have been very tense. Will enthusiasts and pilots of unmanned aircraft, be able to buy DJI drones going forward. I think so, especially with DJI's recent announcement, but if there ever was a time for an American drone company to get its share of the market now seems to be an ideal time. Skydio? Impossible Aerospace? Anybody else?Almost all of the information has been presented to me by anonymous sources. These include former DJI employees as well as people who have been working closely for a significant time with the drone maker. I have tried my best to cross-reference the information I received and feel confident that it provides an accurate picture of what is currently happening at DJI.If you happen to be one of the people who have lost their job as a result of DJI's reorganization and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to me at: xxxxxxxxxxx"

This is pretty normal for any company in the US to enforce the same tactics , its some panic yes but most of what i read is standard procedure for any company let alone one in a panic.

Its interesting though as I was hoping that DJI would be getting on the American Stock exchange and I see that is not likely to happen.

There business model was solid , but the move to make the Mini seemed like some last ditch effort to Capitalize on something that was maybe falling apart in the back end do to who knows what.

Fading out the Phantom was a strange business decision , as that was the bread for a long time and many were loyal and waiting for the next Phantom.

As a pilot of these drones none of this affects us except for the company fading away there Product base .

We saw this with the Phantom and were seeing it with the Mavic 2 Enterprise as the wait times for parts and such our almost 6 to 8 months before the Virus entered the equation.

Im sure china was unprepared for the FAA to stop all the Momentum that was building in the Drone community and I would have loved to be in that meeting.

Fake DJI Meeting:
Hey lets fade out the Phantom and force them to the Mavic 2 Pro /zoom Ok great idea .

Yeah and lets offer a super cheap , super tiny, super cool one so no one get the Mavic 2 till after they have the mini and will make it so light that it will blow away in the wind and than they will have to get a mavic 2 so we end selling both of them, Brilliant !!!! But what if there is no winds, let us gather and pray.




Getting that kind of Momentum back is not easy and when its gone , layoffs our going to happen as well as restructure.

Everything will calm down, DJI will figure some things out , and everything will fade in the wash , some new things will pop up and DJI will be fine.

Thanks for keeping an eye out for us.

Phamtomrain.org
Coal
 
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Reading that was an ordeal.
Whoever wrote it needs to learn about paragraphs.
Agreed-it was very hard to read. I don't know who this person is, but the information is troubling. I've been hearing horror stories about DJI's customer service (and the lack and/or variability thereof) for years now. Personally, I love their products and their tech, but I have a feeling that the company's in far worse shape than any of us know, and their CEO may be a brilliant technologist, but is not a very good manager. Just my two cent's worth.
 

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Agreed-it was very hard to read. I don't know who this person is, but the information is troubling. I've been hearing horror stories about DJI's customer service (and the lack and/or variability thereof) for years now. Personally, I love their products and their tech, but I have a feeling that the company's in far worse shape than any of us know, and their CEO may be a brilliant technologist, but is not a very good manager. Just my two cent's worth.
Google can't find that text so I'm not sure where it's been picked up from.
But there's a clue toward the end where it says:
DroneXL's take ....
If you happen to be one of the people who have lost their job as a result of DJI's reorganization and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to me at: xxxxxxxxxxx

DroneXL is the new business of the former lead writer from DroneDJ.
He's been spreading DJI rumours and searching for scoops for a long time.

It'd take the garbled "information" with more than a grain of salt.
Much of it is the kind of thing that a huge number of companies are doing because of the corona virus problems.
There have been complaints about DJI service forever (whether or not they are valid).
In the echo chambers of drone forums they have created a myth that's larger than the true situation.
All kinds of crazy theories about what DJI's doing grow in forums and many are certainly complete fantasy.

It's hard to know the truth because DJI is so tight-lipped.
They definitely suffered a large setback with the fraud case a while back.
It was around that time that they mysteriously stopped production of the Phantom 4 pro for a year with the (hard to believe) explanation of a parts shortage problem.
 
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The problem is widespread. We'll be lucky if supply chains of essential items don't catastrophically fail in the next month, leading to worldwide famine and millions or tens of millions of deaths.
 
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Interesting, but I can’t seem to find any collaborating information.

A quick look at Glassdoor, employee reviews are generally poor. Not unusual for a high growth company like this. Usually, when mass lay-offs happen, you get lots of bad press. Especially if they were managed poorly (I.e. no severance, legal threats). I’m not seeing that here:


Also, local press has been denying the story.


There may have been some layoffs, but it doesn’t like sound anything as substantive as the post would imply.

Maybe others have more source information to back up the post, I am not finding it.
 
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The one two punch of increasingly tense trade relationships and the pandemic can easily account for a significant drop off in business and with no clear end for either downsizing was inevitable. That said I'm not sure how much of an opportunity this is for U.S. companies to fill any gap. We are dealing with the same pandemic, pending legislation that will impact drones and uncertainty about what role there is for drone delivery services. Those uncertainties don't paint an optimistic outlooking for the drone industry in general.
 

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The problem is widespread. We'll be lucky if supply chains of essential items don't catastrophically fail in the next month, leading to worldwide famine and millions or tens of millions of deaths.
ms-HACtZx.gif
 
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I read this today in a different forum. I don't know th author, but found this believable, and troubling:
"
This will be posted in the next few days- the author is still working on it. But many employees have changed their linkedIn profiles to record the fact that they were laid off:DJI is a privately-held company and, unlike Amazon or Apple, it does not need to provide quarterly statements or annual reports to the public. The absence of such reports makes it near impossible for outsiders to get a sense of how the company performs. Especially after recent rumors of layoffs and drastic reorganization, many people, including myself, have been wondering what is going on with DJI. To find out more, I have reached out to several people close to the DJI organization, and I have been contacted by former DJI employees to help create a clearer picture of what is happening within DJI.First DJI's sales and profits tankedInformation we received from DJI insiders, and people closely related to the company, indicate that sales for March may be down by as much as 80% year-over-year. Profits are reportedly down even more. The dramatic decrease in sales is directly linked to the rapid spreading coronavirus, although sales had been down already due to the implemented trade tariffs and the increasing geopolitical tensions between the U.S and China. It seems that DJI saw the coronavirus as an excellent opportunity to clean their house and reorganize its business, resulting in a large number of layoffs across its organization.The layoffs appear not only to be limited to the U.S. offices of DJI. We have received reports of similar organizational changes in Europe and in Shenzhen, China.In the U.S., most of the layoffs seem to have impacted the Burbank, California office, where reportedly mostly older and Caucasian employees were let go. Other DJI offices in Cerritos, CA, Palo Alto, CA, and New York, NY, have seen layoffs as well.Most of the layoffs in the U.S., during which about 30% of total staff lost their jobs, took place unceremoniously around March 27th. A second round, however, is rumored to take place around April 25th, which may result in about half the total U.S. staff having lost their jobs."By May 1st, DJI will have laid-off over 50% of U.S. staff. This is support staff, repair staff, marketing staff, and software engineering staff - across all divisions in all U.S. sites from Burbank to Cerritos to Palo Alto to NYC," said a senior legal adviser to DJI who has direct firsthand knowledge. "Large quantities of layoffs have occurred internationally, and more will follow as well."The Cerritos offices are DJI's primary repair and maintenance facility for the North American market. Even though select repair centers in Canada also perform basic repairs, any issues related to flight log decryption or analysis are dealt with in California or back in Shenzhen, China.In Burbank, CA, where DJI's marketing and sales operations are based, as many as 20 out of 40 employees reportedly lost their jobs. Some of these positions are allegedly now filled by ex-Huawei employees.DJI's New York offices are much smaller, housing only about 15-20 people. About five people reportedly lost their jobs at this location.Many of DJI's long term partners and dealers did not receive any upfront warning about the changes that were about to take place in the organization, leaving many of them wondering what had happened to their account managers.One former employee said that "DJI terminated 30% of [its] employees with any advance notice, with only a few days left till the end of the month and end of health insurance coverage, during the worst pandemic that has hit the world in recent years."DJI's "heavy-handed and unprofessional approach" to the layoffs saw people being escorted out of the buildings by security and without any severance packages. The same senior legal adviser, I quoted earlier, said:"DJI showed a remarkable lack of empathy and professionalism in discarding some very loyal employees. Even though economically DJI is seeing a massive reduction in revenue and had to reduce employment positions, the way they handled this was unconscionable and reflects in such a bad way on the culture of this company. It isn't cultural as relating to China- because we deal with many other massive Asian companies. It is cultural to DJI."Return DJI's drone hardware or else...Some of the former employees were asked to return any drone equipment and other hardware belonging to DJI within a week of receiving their termination notice. This request was nearly impossible to comply with, given the coronavirus lockdown situation in New York and California. Allegedly, some former employees were threatened with law enforcement seizure and legal action for 'theft' of company property, simply because they were unable to transport significant amounts of drone hardware back to the offices within the limited timeframe provided by DJI.The situation at DJI's head offices in Shenzhen, China, is not much better apparently. Many of the drone makers employees, half of whom are still working from home, were asked to come into the offices for a meeting. After the layoffs were announced and after handing over any equipment, they were cut off from work email and escorted out of the building. The layoffs occurred across DJI's consumer, enterprise, and agriculture departments.While we do not have any specific information about any layoffs in Europe, it seems that they did not escape unscathed.DJI diversifies its product offering to offset diminishing drone salesAs we have seen a dramatic slow down in drone sales over the last two years, it comes as no surprise that DJI has been looking to diversify its product offering. The company has had the Ronin-S, the Osmo, and the Osmo Mobile products for some time. Still, more recently they added the Osmo Pocket, Robomaster S1, Osmo Action, and made a big push into the LiDAR market with its subsidiary LIVOX.Frank Wang has allegedly hired a Huawei consultant to advise him on how to restructure DJI in these turbulent times. In combination with China now having become DJI's largest market, this has led to more Chinese employees being pushed into strategic positions within the company. Many international employees fear that with these changes, concerns in the U.S. about DJI's treatment of data security might no longer receive the attention they deserve. DJI's strategic focus now seems to be on producing good hardware and less so on offering the services and software that customers in Europe and North America are asking for.Mario Rebello's recent departure from DJI is an example of how things have changed within DJI. During his time with the drone maker in North America, Rebello was very focused on convincing the various departments of the U.S. government that DJI drones could be safely used. The company worked closely together with the Department of the Interior to develop a special 'Government Edition' that would make it impossible for certain drones to transmit any information over the internet and thus possibly back to China.Besides having hired a Huawei consultant, DJI's founder Frank Wang has allegedly brought a number of ex-employees from shuttered Huawei U.S. offices into DJI's Burbank location. Many of DJI's international staff oppose this move as Huawei's influence and a poor approach to U.S.-China relation has caused their company to be shut out of the U.S. market. And most believe that it would be best for DJI to distance itself from any Huawei association in light of the current geopolitical tension.We have received information that Mario Rebello will likely not be the last high-ranking U.S. executive to leave DJI, as reportedly four more senior people are looking to exit the organization in the near future.DroneXL's takeThe layoffs and overall changes in the organization, make you wonder what will be in store for DJI in the next few years. Specifically, in the U.S. market, where trade relations with China have been very tense. Will enthusiasts and pilots of unmanned aircraft, be able to buy DJI drones going forward. I think so, especially with DJI's recent announcement, but if there ever was a time for an American drone company to get its share of the market now seems to be an ideal time. Skydio? Impossible Aerospace? Anybody else?Almost all of the information has been presented to me by anonymous sources. These include former DJI employees as well as people who have been working closely for a significant time with the drone maker. I have tried my best to cross-reference the information I received and feel confident that it provides an accurate picture of what is currently happening at DJI.If you happen to be one of the people who have lost their job as a result of DJI's reorganization and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to me at: xxxxxxxxxxx"
I doubt DJI is Privately owned, Nothing in China which makes money is not controlled by the CCP!
 
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I say good! I hope all Chinese companies go out of business. As an American I hope we are able to wean ourselves off Chinese products quickly. Remember that every Chinese company is really government owned.

It amazes me that after what went on with this pandemic that some countries still think it's a good idea to use a Chinese communications infrastructure.

I personally will try to boycott Chinese products if possible and will pay double if there is a non-Chinese product available.
 
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I say good! I hope all Chinese companies go out of business. As an American I hope we are able to wean ourselves off Chinese products quickly. Remember that every Chinese company is really government owned.

It amazes me that after what went on with this pandemic that some countries still think it's a good idea to use a Chinese communications infrastructure.

I personally will try to boycott Chinese products if possible and will pay double if there is a non-Chinese product available.
I believe that leaves you with Skydio as your only viable option? I don't know but I'd imagine they use Chinese components.. (Assembled or made in the USA?) As an European, I'd prefer to buy European, but I don't want a Parrot, I want a DJI..
 
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I believe that leaves you with Skydio as your only viable option? I don't know but I'd imagine they use Chinese components.. (Assembled or made in the USA?) As an European, I'd prefer to buy European, but I don't want a Parrot, I want a DJI..

You're correct on the component side.

I'm somewhat torn on the issue because while I'd like to punish the Chinese government I'd like to spare doing a lot of hurt to the Chinese people. This is a complicated situation. All people everywhere basically want to take care of their family, pursue their goals and live a life of peace. There should be fair competition that allows everyone to work hard toward fulfill those goals. Unfortunately through deceitful and corrupt practices the competition between the U.S. and China hasn't been fair and the U.S. in many cases has been getting the short end of the stick with American workers suffering the consequences.

How to correct this I don't know. We still hold some leverage over China but that leverage is diminishing as they develop their domestic market and continue to penetrate markets in other parts of the world.
 

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