Generator Charging Batteries

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Hey All,
I know there are a lot of generator threads but after some help with a specific question. I am heading to Greece to do archaeological fieldwork, and I require a generator for 6 weeks. I have found this one online for cheap in a Greek hardware store. Can anyone tell me if this would work with P2 batteries?
ΓΕΝΝΗΤΡΙΑ ΒΕΝΖΙΝΗΣ BUDGET 1,3KW | Praktiker

I just don't know much about watts and everything else. I'd have to use a power converter so my Aussie plugs would work in European outlet.

Secondly, could I use a powerboard from the generator to charge 2/3 batteries at same time? Or should I not tempt fate and just charge one per time?

Any help would be amazing.
 
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The generator would be fine to manage the charging requirements for your dji charger, the plug adaptor is easy to get for your pin configuration and the voltage for the dji charger will manage between 120v-240v. The problem would be if the cheap generator is able to deliver a reliable and consistent output. Since you are not running through a charger/convertor set up, it may not be too bad, although the smart electronics in the batteries may not like a rubbish output. You may want to investigate a plug in filter to manage any spikes from your genset to your powerboard. You mentioned Aussie plugs so you might want to visit a place like JB HiFi or whatever **** smith is called these days. Actually BCF carries a range of inline filters in their camping range.
 
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The DJI charger is only rated at 100W so even conservatively a 1.3kW generator (which is a very small generator) would be able to charge 10 or more of them but it would have no chance of powering an electric jug (usually 2.4kW). The smart electronics in the batteries should be ok, the charger rectifies and smooths the power out first before the electronics see it. A car charger would be a simpler option.
 
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The DJI charger is only rated at 100W so even conservatively a 1.3kW generator (which is a very small generator) would be able to charge 10 or more of them but it would have no chance of powering an electric jug (usually 2.4kW). The smart electronics in the batteries should be ok, the charger rectifies and smooths the power out first before the electronics see it. A car charger would be a simpler option.

You have assumed the OP has a P4 charger when more than likely he has a P2 (charger is 50w) or a P3 (charger is 57w).
 
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The generator has plenty of power, it will just idle charging your batteries. Like tevek said maybe a inline power filter would be a added precaution to consider.
 
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Why not just use an DC/AC inverter.
 
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You have assumed the OP has a P4 charger when more than likely he has a P2 (charger is 50w) or a P3 (charger is 57w).
Thankyou for pointing that out Jason, you are right. Obviously the P2 and P3 batteries have a smaller capacity than a P4 and therefore a lower charging demand but I wrongly assumed that they would all use the same charger for a simpler parts inventory.
 
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Personally, I prefer a generator that has a sine wave. Charging batteries on one without this a few times should be okay but in the long run you _might_ hurt the condition of the battery slightly.
 
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Personally, I prefer a generator that has a sine wave. Charging batteries on one without this a few times should be okay but in the long run you _might_ hurt the condition of the battery slightly.

The power to your house only uses 70% of a sine wave.
 
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The power to your house only uses 70% of a sine wave.

Can't say what percentage but most non-commercial generators and inverters don't produce a pure sine wave either. Something close to 100% sine is still much better then something that is not labled as producing a sine wave. Someone could argue that the batteries would not be damaged by a non-sine generator. That's certainly possible.
 
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Can't say what percentage but most non-commercial generators and inverters don't produce a pure sine wave either. Something close to 100% sine is still much better then something that is not labled as producing a sine wave. Someone could argue that the batteries would not be damaged by a non-sine generator. That's certainly possible.

A pure sine wave is not usable, realistic nor possible. A DC/AC inverter will not harm any lipo battery and is less expensive then a generator. You need to increase your knowledge of AC electricity before making statements you cannot support.
 
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A pure sine wave is not usable, realistic nor possible. A DC/AC inverter will not harm any lipo battery and is less expensive then a generator. You need to increase your knowledge of AC electricity before making statements you cannot support.

Perhaps I should have said generators labeled as producing a sine wave as opposed to those that done. I did not realize we were going to be splitting hairs and not just discussing the general's that everyone knows.

If sine wave was not important, why would their be a market for them in non-commercial generators? Also, there is a lot of data out there on why those are better for sensitive electronics. Lastly, I'm not saying non-sine wave generators in fact harm DJI batteries. I gave my opinion that I'd consider one that was labeled (changing that as it seems now we are into splitting hairs) as producing a sine wave.

I think the OP understood my post from the start.
 
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The electronic components inside the battery charger could careless if the sine wave is a 100% or 70% because the output is DC at whatever voltage and wattage it was design for.
 
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Thankyou for pointing that out Jason, you are right. Obviously the P2 and P3 batteries have a smaller capacity than a P4 and therefore a lower charging demand but I wrongly assumed that they would all use the same charger for a simpler parts inventory.
First off- thanks everyone for the help. It got a little technical there and to be honest- I struggle with the technicalities of power.
This generator looks great for me simply as my archaeological work has a tiny budget. Also, the site I am working on is a 2km walk down rough mountain tracks, that ascends some 30 stories in height on the way back. Everything is carried in and out and as such, weight is a huge issue.

Yes I have a P2. So what I am getting from the general conversation is:
Yes I can charge batteries using it and I could even hook up a double adaptor/powerboard and charge multiple batteries as I have plenty of watts to play with.
The generator could be a little dodgy and the power could oscillate, meaning it may effect the life of my batteries?
I should try use an inline power filter to counteract this. Now I have no idea what that is- can anyone direct me to one? Maybe at Jaycar Electronics | Components, connectors, switches, power, and more which I imagine Hhas.

Once again guys- thanks so much! You are amazing!
 
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Just had a look at the jay car site, and there are a number of inline filter/ surge and overload powerboards for sale which should be fine to use. MS4057 for less than twenty dollars, you're in luck, the voltage and frequency is the same in Greece as here in Australia. You just need a plug adaptor to suit the powerboard to match the Greek outlet (two round pins vs our three/two angled pins). I used similar boards for years when I lived out of town and they coped with 20 -30v variations.
 
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Just had a look at the jay car site, and there are a number of inline filter/ surge and overload powerboards for sale which should be fine to use. MS4057 for less than twenty dollars, you're in luck, the voltage and frequency is the same in Greece as here in Australia. You just need a plug adaptor to suit the powerboard to match the Greek outlet (two round pins vs our three/two angled pins). I used similar boards for years when I lived out of town and they coped with 20 -30v variations.
Hi, so that powerboard would also act like an inline filter mentioned above? Yes I know the adaptor, but thats the extent of my electrical knowledge hahaha. Thanks so much!
 
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Hi, so that powerboard would also act like an inline filter mentioned above? Yes I know the adaptor, but thats the extent of my electrical knowledge hahaha. Thanks so much!
Yes, they act as a filter for any frequency and voltage spikes and provide current overload protection. They are not world class for $20, but you are charging your batteries and not running a dialysis machine off the genset. Cheers.
 
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Thank you so much for all your help. I will now go buy two of them haha.
Yes, they act as a filter for any frequency and voltage spikes and provide current overload protection. They are not world class for $20, but you are charging your batteries and not running a dialysis machine off the genset. Cheers.
 

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