3-Blade Props Better In High Altitude?

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I understand the dji props are by far the best efficiency for the phantom. But i was wondering if the 3-blade props might do better in the lower pressure air?
 
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I understand the dji props are by far the best efficiency for the phantom. But i was wondering if the 3-blade props might do better in the lower pressure air?
How much lower will the pressure be? We are not trying to fly 50,000 ft above sea level.......
 
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Nope. Some say that at a certain RPM, the additional prop(s) will slip into its own stream and it may be less efficient (less grip of air). Think of boat propellers that spin way too fast and create white wash (air pockets). If too much white wash, then you wont produce effective thrust.

Increasing the diameter of the prop may help, but could hinder weight as they may require larger motors.
 
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Nope. Some say that at a certain RPM, the additional prop(s) will slip into its own stream and it may be less efficient (less grip of air). Think of boat propellers that spin way too fast and create white wash (air pockets). If too much white wash, then you wont produce effective thrust.

Increasing the diameter of the prop may help, but could hinder weight as they may require larger motors.
This is good info. I dont know much about how much air pressure will make a difference, I have only heard there is a difference when flying in Colorado and the copter responding slower. I think I will stick to the originals. thanks
 
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Not sure if this will make any difference in your question but just so you know normal barometric pressure at sea level is around 29.92 " of Mercury or 14.7 psi. In contrast, the barometric pressure in say Denver is 24.63" of Mercury or 12.1 psi. So what does all that tell you. When it comes to flying your drone it means very little. You have to remember the amount of surface area that you're dealing with. If the service area is negligible then the affect will be negligible! Hope this helps


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Not sure if this will make any difference in your question but just so you know normal barometric pressure at sea level is around 29.92 " of Mercury or 14.7 psi. In contrast, the barometric pressure in say Denver is 24.63" of Mercury or 12.1 psi. So what does all that tell you. When it comes to flying your drone it means very little. You have to remember the amount of surface area that you're dealing with. If the service area is negligible then the affect will be negligible! Hope this helps


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Im going up far west in the rockies. Redstone Co, its an hour west of Aspen.
 
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DJI lists the P3P's specs service ceiling at 6000m which calculates to 19,685 feet above sea level. Will you need to fly any higher?


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The highest mountain in the continental US is only about 14,500 feet, so I bet he doesn't.


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